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Fashion show supports charity; international events include Indy professors

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Law School Briefs

Law School Briefs is Indiana Lawyer’s section that highlights news from law schools in Indiana. While we have always covered law school news and will continue to keep up with law school websites and press releases for updates, we’ll gladly accept submissions for this section from law students, professors, alums, and others who want to share law school-related news. If you’d like to submit news or a photo from an event, please send it to Rebecca Berfanger, rberfanger@ibj.com, along with contact information for any follow up questions at least two weeks in advance of the issue date.

Fashion showsupports charity

Phi Alpha Delta at Indiana University Maurer School of Law hosted its annual Fashion Show and Auction Nov. 4 at the Bluebird in Bloomington. Tickets were available for $5 or a donation of three items of gently used professional clothing. The event raised more than $2,000.

Phi Alpha Delta has hosted the event for the past six years, according to the organization’s chapter president, Kristen Cameron, a 3L.

“As a legal fraternity, it’s our mission to provide ‘service to the student, the school, the profession and the community,’” Cameron said via e-mail. “We use a fashion show to raise money because we can kill two birds with one stone – educating law students about event-appropriate attire, and raising money to better the community in which we learn. Each year, the event’s profits are donated to the Shalom Community Center.”

The mission of the center, according to its website, is to help relieve “the plight of people experiencing homelessness and poverty in South Central Indiana. Since access to food, housing, education, and health and human services are fundamental human rights, we seek to meet these basic needs. As a nonprofit resource center, we deliver social services directly and in coalition with other agencies in a respectable, secure environment. We advocate for the most vulnerable among us and promote ties that empower people to develop their potential and to take responsibility for their own lives.”

Phi Alpha Delta, with more than 250,000 living members, is the largest international law fraternity. It is also the largest student group at IU Maurer School of Law, according to the chapter’s website.

International eventsinclude Indy professors

Two Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis professors have traveled internationally this month to speak on various topics.

Professor Karen E. Bravo presented her research on human trafficking at the Second Global Conference on Bullying and the Abuse of Power: From the Playground to International Relations, which took place in Prague, Nov. 8-10.

The event was organized by Inter-Disciplinary.net, a U.K.-based forum for the exchange and interaction of ideas, research, and points of view that address a wide range of issues of concern and interest in the contemporary world.

Bravo presented her research, “Legal Constructions of Personhood and Their Nexus with the Traffic in Human Beings,” during the session on Bullying and Personhood. She also chaired the session on Bullying and Politics.

Bravo was among an international group of attendees from the United Kingdom, Turkey, India, Taiwan, Iran, South Africa, and other countries.

Professor George Edwards was invited to present at London’s Royal Society of International Affairs - Chatham House, the U.K. sister organization of the prestigious U.S. Council on Foreign Relations as part of the Transatlantic Dialogue on International Law. That event took place Nov. 10 - 11.

His presentation was titled “Efficacy of International Law in Protecting Human Rights: Hong Kong, the U.S., the U.K., and Transnational Legal Education.” He was one of two dozen participants invited to join the dialogue, with other participants being officials of the U.S. government, U.K. government, and the European Union, along with representatives of academia and civil society from the U.S., the U.K., and continental Europe.

The Atlantic Council, based in Washington, D.C., co-sponsored the dialogue. The council traces its roots to the creation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and to government officials and voluntary organizations interested in political, economic, and security issues.•

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  1. Poor Judge Brown probably thought that by slavishly serving the godz of the age her violations of 18th century concepts like due process and the rule of law would be overlooked. Mayhaps she was merely a Judge ahead of her time?

  2. in a lawyer discipline case Judge Brown, now removed, was presiding over a hearing about a lawyer accused of the supposedly heinous ethical violation of saying the words "Illegal immigrant." (IN re Barker) http://www.in.gov/judiciary/files/order-discipline-2013-55S00-1008-DI-429.pdf .... I wonder if when we compare the egregious violations of due process by Judge Brown, to her chiding of another lawyer for politically incorrectness, if there are any conclusions to be drawn about what kind of person, what kind of judge, what kind of apparatchik, is busy implementing the agenda of political correctness and making off-limits legit advocacy about an adverse party in a suit whose illegal alien status is relevant? I am just asking the question, the reader can make own conclsuion. Oh wait-- did I use the wrong adjective-- let me rephrase that, um undocumented alien?

  3. of course the bigger questions of whether or not the people want to pay for ANY bussing is off limits, due to the Supreme Court protecting the people from DEMOCRACY. Several decades hence from desegregation and bussing plans and we STILL need to be taking all this taxpayer money to combat mostly-imagined "discrimination" in the most obviously failed social program of the postwar period.

  4. You can put your photos anywhere you like... When someone steals it they know it doesn't belong to them. And, a man getting a divorce is automatically not a nice guy...? That's ridiculous. Since when is need of money a conflict of interest? That would mean that no one should have a job unless they are already financially solvent without a job... A photographer is also under no obligation to use a watermark (again, people know when a photo doesn't belong to them) or provide contact information. Hey, he didn't make it easy for me to pay him so I'll just take it! Well heck, might as well walk out of the grocery store with a cart full of food because the lines are too long and you don't find that convenient. "Only in Indiana." Oh, now you're passing judgement on an entire state... What state do you live in? I need to characterize everyone in your state as ignorant and opinionated. And the final bit of ignorance; assuming a photo anyone would want is lucky and then how much does your camera have to cost to make it a good photo, in your obviously relevant opinion?

  5. Seventh Circuit Court Judge Diane Wood has stated in “The Rule of Law in Times of Stress” (2003), “that neither laws nor the procedures used to create or implement them should be secret; and . . . the laws must not be arbitrary.” According to the American Bar Association, Wood’s quote drives home this point: The rule of law also requires that people can expect predictable results from the legal system; this is what Judge Wood implies when she says that “the laws must not be arbitrary.” Predictable results mean that people who act in the same way can expect the law to treat them in the same way. If similar actions do not produce similar legal outcomes, people cannot use the law to guide their actions, and a “rule of law” does not exist.

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