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Film about climber to be released soon

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Indiana Lawyer Rehearing

Since receiving a call from the family of Aron Ralston, a hiker who cut off his own arm to free himself from a boulder in Utah in May 2003, Indianapolis attorney Ronald E. Elberger has represented Ralston on a book deal, media appearances, and most recently the deal for a movie about his struggle.

That movie, “127 Hours,” based on the book “Between a Rock and a Hard Place,” is scheduled to premiere Nov. 5, according to a release. The movie premieres will take place in Toronto and London. The book was published in September 2004. Elberger’s firm, Bose McKinney & Evans, announced the film and book re-issue deal Nov. 11, 2009.

The film involved “Slumdog Millionaire” director Danny Boyle and writer Simon Beaufoy. Another “Slumdog Millionaire” alum, producer Christian Colson, produced the film with John Smithson, the producer of “Vertical Limit,” another survival story involving mountain climbers.

Ralston has appeared on talk shows and is a motivational speaker where he discusses his ordeal. After his arm was pinned against a canyon wall by a boulder, he amputated it with a pocketknife before descending a 65-foot rock wall and walking 6 miles before he was rescued. His family led the search team when he didn’t check in with them after a longer than usual time had passed.
 

Rehearing "Attorney nets movie deal for climber" Nov. 25-Dec. 8, 2009

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  1. I need an experienced attorney to handle a breach of contract matter. Kindly respond for more details. Graham Young

  2. I thought the slurs were the least grave aspects of her misconduct, since they had nothing to do with her being on the bench. Why then do I suspect they were the focus? I find this a troubling trend. At least she was allowed to keep her law license.

  3. Section 6 of Article I of the Indiana Constitution is pretty clear and unequivocal: "Section 6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury for the benefit of any religious or theological institution."

  4. Video pen? Nice work, "JW"! Let this be a lesson and a caution to all disgruntled ex-spouses (or soon-to-be ex-spouses) . . . you may think that altercation is going to get you some satisfaction . . . it will not.

  5. First comment on this thread is a fitting final comment on this thread, as that the MCBA never answered Duncan's fine question, and now even Eric Holder agrees that the MCBA was in material error as to the facts: "I don't get it" from Duncan December 1, 2014 5:10 PM "The Grand Jury met for 25 days and heard 70 hours of testimony according to this article and they made a decision that no crime occurred. On what basis does the MCBA conclude that their decision was "unjust"? What special knowledge or evidence does the MCBA have that the Grand Jury hearing this matter was unaware of? The system that we as lawyers are sworn to uphold made a decision that there was insufficient proof that officer committed a crime. How can any of us say we know better what was right than the jury that actually heard all of the the evidence in this case."

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