Indiana Roll of Attorneys site gets makeover

February 1, 2013
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The Indiana Roll of Attorneys website has moved into the 21st century and I like it.

Besides getting a new look to match the rest of the recently updated court website, the search function is much more user friendly. As someone who uses the ROA website daily, I’m pleased that I can now enter the person’s first name along with his or her last to search or find someone through his or her attorney number.

Now, instead of having to wade through the one-hundred-plus names that come up when I type in the last name “Smith,” I’m able to narrow my search to include Smith’s first name.

When the results show up on the new ROA site, they provide more information without having to click on a name. I can see attorney number, admit date and his or her status with the bar, as well as city and state information. When I click on a name, the same information as before is provided, but in a cleaner fashion.

While these updates are great, my favorite has to be that I can use the “back” button on my browser and not lose information. With the old ROA site, I had to click the New Search button and retype the information if I didn’t click on the correct “John Smith.” Now, I just hit back and can select another name.

Take a look at the new site for yourself: https://courtapps.in.gov/rollofattorneys  

Once the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals updates its opinions website, (which looks like it was designed in Geocities circa 1997) I will be a very happy court website user.
 

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  1. Frankly, it is tragic that you are even considering going to an expensive, unaccredited "law school." It is extremely difficult to get a job with a degree from a real school. If you are going to make the investment of time, money, and tears into law school, it should not be to a place that won't actually enable you to practice law when you graduate.

  2. As a lawyer who grew up in Fort Wayne (but went to a real law school), it is not that hard to find a mentor in the legal community without your school's assistance. One does not need to pay tens of thousands of dollars to go to an unaccredited legal diploma mill to get a mentor. Having a mentor means precisely nothing if you cannot get a job upon graduation, and considering that the legal job market is utterly terrible, these students from Indiana Tech are going to be adrift after graduation.

  3. 700,000 to 800,000 Americans are arrested for marijuana possession each year in the US. Do we need a new justice center if we decriminalize marijuana by having the City Council enact a $100 fine for marijuana possession and have the money go towards road repair?

  4. I am sorry to hear this.

  5. I tried a case in Judge Barker's court many years ago and I recall it vividly as a highlight of my career. I don't get in federal court very often but found myself back there again last Summer. We had both aged a bit but I must say she was just as I had remembered her. Authoritative, organized and yes, human ...with a good sense of humor. I also appreciated that even though we were dealing with difficult criminal cases, she treated my clients with dignity and understanding. My clients certainly respected her. Thanks for this nice article. Congratulations to Judge Barker for reaching another milestone in a remarkable career.

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