Economy’s effect on diversity

October 7, 2009
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
According to the Minority Law Journal’s Minority Experience Study, minorities are feeling the effect of the economy worse than their Caucasian counterparts. The survey asked midlevel associates (third-, fourth-, and fifth-year associates) a series of questions, including whether they were actively seeking other jobs, whether they’d be at their current firm in two years, billable hours, and pay cuts.

According the survey, almost a third of African-American respondents, and nearly a quarter of Hispanic and Asian-American attorneys have high levels of anxiety at their firms about job security. Just over 20 percent of white associates reported high anxiety.

More minorities than whites said their workloads were too light, and minorities posted fewer billable hours than their white counterparts. This was true in last year’s survey, too, but a greater percentage of associates in all ethnic groups said the recession has affected them this year.

According to the survey, it appears black attorneys are having the most trouble with the current economic situation and its impact at firms. African-Americans reported changing practice areas because of the recession the least, were actively looking for another job more than any other group, and were more likely to view the way work is distributed at their firms as less fair than their colleagues.

Billable hours are down for every group, but as usual, the minorities still had fewer hours. You can read more about the survey here.

Also in the article on the study, some feared the economy is pushing firms backward in their diversity efforts and that any strides made over the last few years will be erased. Instead of putting time and resources into recruiting and retaining minority attorneys, firms are trying to find ways to slash costs and focus on keeping the companies profitable.

Are the sentiments the same at Indiana firms? Are minorities more affected and worried about the economy or are all attorneys feeling the same anxiety?
ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
  1. Whilst it may be true that Judges and Justices enjoy such freedom of time and effort, it certainly does not hold true for the average working person. To say that one must 1) take a day or a half day off work every 3 months, 2) gather a list of information including recent photographs, and 3) set up a time that is convenient for the local sheriff or other such office to complete the registry is more than a bit near-sighted. This may be procedural, and hence, in the near-sighted minds of the court, not 'punishment,' but it is in fact 'punishment.' The local sheriffs probably feel a little punished too by the overwork. Registries serve to punish the offender whilst simultaneously providing the public at large with a false sense of security. The false sense of security is dangerous to the public who may not exercise due diligence by thinking there are no offenders in their locale. In fact, the registry only informs them of those who have been convicted.

  2. Unfortunately, the court doesn't understand the difference between ebidta and adjusted ebidta as they clearly got the ruling wrong based on their misunderstanding

  3. A common refrain in the comments on this website comes from people who cannot locate attorneys willing put justice over retainers. At the same time the judiciary threatens to make pro bono work mandatory, seemingly noting the same concern. But what happens to attorneys who have the chumptzah to threatened the legal status quo in Indiana? Ask Gary Welch, ask Paul Ogden, ask me. Speak truth to power, suffer horrendously accordingly. No wonder Hoosier attorneys who want to keep in good graces merely chase the dollars ... the powers that be have no concerns as to those who are ever for sale to the highest bidder ... for those even willing to compromise for $$$ never allow either justice or constitutionality to cause them to stand up to injustice or unconstitutionality. And the bad apples in the Hoosier barrel, like this one, just keep rotting.

  4. I am one of Steele's victims and was taken for $6,000. I want my money back due to him doing nothing for me. I filed for divorce after a 16 year marriage and lost everything. My kids, my home, cars, money, pension. Every attorney I have talked to is not willing to help me. What can I do? I was told i can file a civil suit but you have to have all of Steelers info that I don't have. Of someone can please help me or tell me what info I need would be great.

  5. It would appear that news breaking on Drudge from the Hoosier state (link below) ties back to this Hoosier story from the beginning of the recent police disrespect period .... MCBA president Cassandra Bentley McNair issued the statement on behalf of the association Dec. 1. The association said it was “saddened and disappointed” by the decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson for shooting Michael Brown. “The MCBA does not believe this was a just outcome to this process, and is disheartened that the system we as lawyers are intended to uphold failed the African-American community in such a way,” the association stated. “This situation is not just about the death of Michael Brown, but the thousands of other African-Americans who are disproportionately targeted and killed by police officers.” http://www.thestarpress.com/story/news/local/2016/07/18/hate-cops-sign-prompts-controversy/87242664/

ADVERTISEMENT