Fest to show legal movies

October 15, 2009
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Reporter Rebecca Berfanger wrote this post.

If you’re looking to see some uplifting movies that probably won’t be at a cineplex near you any time soon, while supporting an Indianapolis tradition, check out the Heartland Film Festival, which runs today through Oct. 24 at AMC Castleton Square and AMC Greenwood Park.And if you want to see some legal-themed movies, here are three worth checking out that will play multiple times over the next week and a half:

That Evening Sun” a dramatic feature starring Hal Holbrook, Ray McKinnon, Walter Goggins, Mia Wasikowska, Barry Corbin, and Dixie Carter. A lawyer sends his aging father, a farmer in Tennessee, to a nursing home. The father escapes from the facility and returns home where he finds his old enemy is now a tenant on his farm. As a result, the old farmer moves into another building and refuses to leave until he gets his land back.

Rough Aunties” is a documentary that is heartbreaking and uplifting at the same time. It follows women who are advocates for abused children in Durban, South Africa, through their program, Operation Bobbi Bear. The film includes the highs and lows of the women’s personal lives as well. Expect tears and cheers.

The German dramatic feature “Storm” makes its U.S. premiere at the festival. A prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal in The Hague may be in over her head during a trial against a former commander of the Yugoslavian National Army who is accused of crimes against humanity. When a key witness commits suicide, it is up to the prosecutor and her sister to risk their own lives for the sake of the trial.

Dates, times, and locations for these and all featured films are on the festival’s Web site, www.heartlandfilmfest.org.
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  1. Based on several recent Indy Star articles, I would agree that being a case worker would be really hard. You would see the worst of humanity on a daily basis; and when things go wrong guess who gets blamed??!! Not biological parent!! Best of luck to those who entered that line of work.

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  3. Don't believe me, listen to Pacino: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6bC9w9cH-M

  4. Law school is social control the goal to produce a social product. As such it began after the Revolution and has nearly ruined us to this day: "“Scarcely any political question arises in the United States which is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question. Hence all parties are obliged to borrow, in their daily controversies, the ideas, and even the language, peculiar to judicial proceedings. As most public men [i.e., politicians] are, or have been, legal practitioners, they introduce the customs and technicalities of their profession into the management of public affairs. The jury extends this habitude to all classes. The language of the law thus becomes, in some measure, a vulgar tongue; the spirit of the law, which is produced in the schools and courts of justice, gradually penetrates beyond their walls into the bosom of society, where it descends to the lowest classes, so that at last the whole people contract the habits and the tastes of the judicial magistrate.” ? Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America

  5. Attorney? Really? Or is it former attorney? Status with the Ind St Ct? Status with federal court, with SCOTUS? This is a legal newspaper, or should I look elsewhere?

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