How hard is it to do CLE?

May 18, 2010
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IL reporter Rebecca Berfanger contributed today’s blog post.

Do you recognize anyone you know on this list?

It’s the annual order of suspension of attorneys who haven’t paid their registration fees on time and/or they haven’t completed the required number of CLE hours.

The full list of 256 suspended attorneys licensed to practice in Indiana was issued May 14 and posted online today.

While looking at the list as a staff, we noticed attorneys who’ve been in the news recently for good and bad reasons, at least one judge, and 112 attorneys with out of state addresses.

As for the 144 attorneys listed with Indiana addresses: 105 lawyers were behind on registration fees, and 67 didn’t meet CLE requirements. Mixed in with those two groups were 28 lawyers who didn’t do either.

These numbers do not include the attorneys who have asked for and have been granted extensions to fulfill these requirements, according to the order.

Every year I wonder how so many attorneys slip by without meeting these seemingly simple requirements.

Even as a non-attorney I often see notices about CLE courses: I hear about pro bono districts that provide free CLE in exchange for taking on a case or participating in a Talk to a Lawyer Today program; county bar association newsletters include prominently placed CLE calendars; the law school events calendars I check for story ideas often offer CLE credits for specialized topics; and of course ICLEF’s website has links to CLE events.

And just in case you missed it, IL daily has a link to our CLE calendar at the bottom of every e-mail we send.

I also often hear from sources that CLE is expensive and not always easy to fit into one’s schedule of trials and client meetings, but I’ve yet to hear a source tell me there’s any reason they do not do it.

If your name is on here – what’s your excuse?
 

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  1. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  2. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  3. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  4. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  5. I totally agree with John Smith.

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