Happy lawyers are healthy lawyers

July 12, 2010
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Are lawyers just an unhappy bunch of people? Based on recent books aimed at attorneys, you’d get that impression.

Harvey Hyman is one of the latest people to write a book aimed at helping attorneys. Attorneys, as you may know, often spend a lot of time working. Being a lawyer is a stressful job and can lead to drug and alcohol abuse and addiction or mental-health issues.

Hyman, a personal injury attorney, disliked the long hours at work and was hospitalized with severe depression. He overcame it with meditation, exercise, and positive psychology. Now he wants to help you.

His book, “The Upward Spiral: Getting Lawyers from Daily Misery to Lifetime Wellbeing” shows attorneys how to use meditation, nutrition, and therapy to make themselves happier. Happier attorneys mean less stressed attorneys, which can translate into fewer chemically addicted or depressed attorneys.

If this book doesn’t sound like your thing, there are countless others out there aimed specifically at attorneys. There’s a new book called “The Happy Lawyer: Making a Good Life in the Law.” Not specifically a self-help book, it discusses how career choices can maximize the chances of achieving happiness.
Go to amazon.com and type in “lawyer happy.” You’ll get “The Happy Lawyer” but you’ll also find “The Unhappy Lawyer: A Roadmap to Finding Meaningful Work Outside of the Law,” “The Happy Lawyer: How to Gain More Satisfaction, Suffer Less Stress, and Enjoy Higher Earnings in Your Law Practice.” No doubt that many of the self-help books out there geared toward attorneys tackle happiness.

Is the lack of happiness key to attorneys (or really anyone) turning to drugs or alcohol, or becoming depressed? Do you find yourself unhappy because of your job? Would you buy one of these books?
 

ADVERTISEMENT
  • Mediation or Meditation
    I respectfully suggest that there is a typo in this story. I imagine that, instead of mediation being his path towards happiness, Harvey Hyman probably practiced meditation.
  • Correction
    You're right. Thanks for pointing that out. I've made the correction.
  • Meditation
    Great! Thanks for your thoughts about various ways for lawyers to de-stress and find a healthier path. I think lawyers' stress is a huge problem. Love yoga and meditation -- and exercise. They have done me a world of good. In fact, I am taking a yoga teacher training course now. It's wonderful to learn this 3,000 year old practice.

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
  1. First comment on this thread is a fitting final comment on this thread, as that the MCBA never answered Duncan's fine question, and now even Eric Holder agrees that the MCBA was in material error as to the facts: "I don't get it" from Duncan December 1, 2014 5:10 PM "The Grand Jury met for 25 days and heard 70 hours of testimony according to this article and they made a decision that no crime occurred. On what basis does the MCBA conclude that their decision was "unjust"? What special knowledge or evidence does the MCBA have that the Grand Jury hearing this matter was unaware of? The system that we as lawyers are sworn to uphold made a decision that there was insufficient proof that officer committed a crime. How can any of us say we know better what was right than the jury that actually heard all of the the evidence in this case."

  2. wow is this a bunch of bs! i know the facts!

  3. MCBA .... time for a new release about your entire membership (or is it just the alter ego) being "saddened and disappointed" in the failure to lynch a police officer protecting himself in the line of duty. But this time against Eric Holder and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: "WASHINGTON — Justice Department lawyers will recommend that no civil rights charges be brought against the police officer who fatally shot an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Mo., after an F.B.I. investigation found no evidence to support charges, law enforcement officials said Wednesday." http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/22/us/justice-department-ferguson-civil-rights-darren-wilson.html?ref=us&_r=0

  4. Dr wail asfour lives 3 hours from the hospital,where if he gets an emergency at least he needs three hours,while even if he is on call he should be in a location where it gives him max 10 minutes to be beside the patient,they get paid double on their on call days ,where look how they handle it,so if the death of the patient occurs on weekend and these doctors still repeat same pattern such issue should be raised,they should be closer to the patient.on other hand if all the death occured on the absence of the Dr and the nurses handle it,the nurses should get trained how to function appearntly they not that good,if the Dr lives 3 hours far from the hospital on his call days he should sleep in the hospital

  5. It's a capital offense...one for you Latin scholars..

ADVERTISEMENT