Interviews over, now wait begins

July 30, 2010
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From IL reporter Mike Hoskins:

JUDGE ROBYN MOBERLY: Though she’s proud of handling some of the most complex and varied litigation throughout the state, Judge Moberly said she’s most proud of the energy and initiative she’s put into the state’s Family Court Project, which she’s been a part of since it started almost a decade ago. “One reason I mention that, not only because it’s a passion of mine, is that I want to illustrate the possibilities of what support from the Supreme Court can do for local communities.”

The burgeoning number of pro se litigants is one of the biggest concerns she sees the judiciary facing, and one idea would be for the justices to implement a public law librarian program modeled after how the court recruits teachers to educate students about the Third Branch. Judge Moberly also explained the importance of managing the inevitable statewide court system changes, and how statewide funding is a significant point to consider. She said regional funding might be a step in that direction, and something that everyone can more easily agree on.

Judge Moberly discussed her multiple Supreme Court assignments on disciplinary cases, media matters, and the child support guideline revisions. She also reflected on her views on precedent when there are conflicting Court of Appeal panel rulings, that the doctrinal basis of each case and issue must be analyzed, she said.

JUDGE STEVEN NATION: Judge Nation was the only of the nine semi-finalists that commission members almost didn’t have enough time to ask any questions of, as he spent almost his entire 30-minute interview addressing the submitted two-part question. As far as his biggest accomplishment, he told members about how he wants to be remembered for treating everyone in his court with respect.

The judge discussed how the courts could better reach out to at-risk attorneys on mentoring and tutoring, and he also suggested changes in how judges are designated to do complex litigation. Senior judges could be used to handle the more regular judicial tasks while the active judge handles the more complicated matter. He also suggested expanding the use of interlocutory appeals, as well as getting attorneys more involved in the overall process in different ways.

KIPLEY DREW: She delved into her background that touches on a wide variety of issues, from evicting college residents, to a multi-million software contract, to how daycare operators might have to be aware of a decree or protective order when someone comes to pick up a child. Drew praised the court reform efforts on judicial education and said she’d like to see more outreach opportunities to enhance the public perception of the state judiciary. She talked about justices having to maintain an extra level of discretion to avoid the perception of impropriety, and that while politics shouldn’t be a consideration a justice must be aware of potential ripple effects from any decision.

One commission member asked Drew about her ability to not be influenced by her husband's job clerking for Indiana Court of Appeals Chief Judge John Baker. She said it wouldn't be an issue.

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  1. @BryanJBrown, You are totally correct. I have no words, you nailed it.....

  2. You have not overstated the reality of the present situation. The government inquisitor in my case, who demanded that I, on the record, to choose between obedience to God's law or man's law, remains on the BLE, even an officer of the BLE, and was recently renewed in her contract for another four years. She has a long history in advancing LGBQT rights. http://www.realjock.com/article/1071 THINK WITH ME: What if a currently serving BLE officer or analogous court official (ie discplinary officer) asked an atheist to affirm the Existence, or demanded a transsexual to undergo a mental evaluation to probe his/her alleged mindcrime? That would end a career. The double standard is glaring, see the troubling question used to ban me for life from the Ind bar right here: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners (see page 8 of 21) Again, what if I had been a homosexual rights activist before law school rather than a prolife activist? A gay rights activist after law school admitted to the SCOTUS and Kansas since 1996, without discipline? A homosexual rights activist who had argued before half the federal appellate courts in the country? I am pretty certain that had I been that LGBQT activist, and not a pro-life activist, my passing of the Indiana bar exam would have rendered me an Indiana attorney .... rather than forever banished. So yes, there is a glaring double standard. And some are even beyond the reach of constitutional and statutory protections. I was.

  3. Historically speaking pagans devalue children and worship animals. How close are we? Consider the ruling above plus today's tidbit from the politically correct high Court: http://indianacourts.us/times/2016/12/are-you-asking-the-right-questions-intimate-partner-violence-and-pet-abuse/

  4. The father is a convicted of spousal abuse. 2 restaining orders been put on him, never made any difference the whole time she was there. The time he choked the mother she dropped the baby the police were called. That was the only time he was taken away. The mother was suppose to have been notified when he was released no call was ever made. He made his way back, kicked the door open and terrified the mother. She ran down the hallway and locked herself and the baby in the bathroom called 911. The police came and said there was nothing they could do (the policeman was a old friend from highschool, good ole boy thing).They told her he could burn the place down as long as she wasn't in it.The mother got another resataining order, the judge told her if you were my daughter I would tell you to leave. So she did. He told her "If you ever leave me I will make your life hell, you don't know who your f!@#$%^ with". The fathers other 2 grown children from his 1st exwife havent spoke 1 word to him in almost 15yrs not 1 word.This is what will be a forsure nightmare for this little girl who is in the hands of pillar of the community. Totally corrupt system. Where I come from I would be in jail not only for that but non payment of child support. Unbelievably pitiful...

  5. dsm 5 indicates that a lot of kids with gender dysphoria grow out of it. so is it really a good idea to encourage gender reassignment? Perhaps that should wait for the age of majority. I don't question the compassionate motives of many of the trans-advocates, but I do question their wisdom. Likewise, they should not question the compassion of those whose potty policies differ. too often, any opposition to the official GLBT agenda is instantly denounced as "homophobia" etc.

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