Director discusses re-entry program's success

December 2, 2010
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Reporter Rebecca Berfanger wrote this blog post.

A number of people gathered in Indianapolis Wednesday night to commemorate World AIDS Day. Speakers discussed not only the history of AIDS in Indiana, but the various prevention and education efforts that are going on around the state, including a program for offenders who are preparing to re-enter society.

That program, Thresholds & Transitions, which Indiana Lawyer first reported on in the March 17, 2010, issue, focuses on helping the offenders to have healthy bodies, minds, and relationships. Through “Healthy @ Re-Entry” classes, program director Tommy Chittenden and guest speakers teach program participants about prevention of tuberculosis, as well as HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases; substance abuse prevention; employment placement opportunities; anger management; and how to maintain healthy relationships with family and friends.

This program has been effective, Chittenden told the audience, because it takes a holistic approach to healthy living before and after the participants leave the confines of prison. He added the program’s sessions that require participants to self-reflect are often the first time that many of them have been asked to think about who they are and why they have engaged in certain behaviors in the first place.

He compared the information about how to avoid bad behavior to a download of information. Only in this case, the participant’s mind is the computer’s processor. So if a person’s mind cannot interpret the information because of a previous issue – whether that’s addiction or a feeling that the person is unworthy of love and respect – then that information doesn’t matter to the individual who is receiving it.

But if the mind can make some sense of it, the person can then get better.

In their evaluation forms at the end of the intensive program, he said the participants will often write they finally feel worthy of making healthier decisions because they now know why they have acted the way they have and now know how to change it when they’re back on the outside.

Some participants have been in prison 20 years or longer, he added.

To wrap up his discussion about the program, Chittenden read one of the participants’ favorite poems, “There’s a Hole in my Sidewalk” by Portia Nelson:

Chapter One
I walk down the street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I fall in. I am lost. I am helpless. It isn't my fault. It takes forever to find a way out.

Chapter Two
I walk down the street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I pretend that I don't see it. I fall in again. I can't believe I am in this same place. But, it isn't my fault. It still takes a long time to get out.

Chapter Three
I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I see it is there. I still fall in. It's a habit. But, my eyes are open. I know where I am. It is my fault. I get out immediately.

Chapter Four
I walk down the same street. There is a deep hole in the sidewalk. I walk around it.

Chapter Five
I walk down another street.

For many of the people he has worked with, Chittenden said many of them didn’t know there was another street. But now they do.
 

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
  1. Please I need help with my class action lawsuits, im currently in pro-se and im having hard time findiNG A LAWYER TO ASSIST ME

  2. Access to the court (judiciary branch of government) is the REAL problem, NOT necessarily lack of access to an attorney. Unfortunately, I've lived in a legal and financial hell for the past six years due to a divorce (where I was, supposedly, represented by an attorney) in which I was defrauded of settlement and the other party (and helpers) enriched through the fraud. When I attempted to introduce evidence and testify (pro se) in a foreclosure/eviction, I was silenced (apparently on procedural grounds, as research I've done since indicates). I was thrown out of a residence which was to be sold, by a judge who refused to allow me to speak in (the supposedly "informal") small claims court where the eviction proceeding (by ex-brother-in-law) was held. Six years and I can't even get back on solid or stable ground ... having bank account seized twice, unlawfully ... and now, for the past year, being dragged into court - again, contrary to law and appellate decisions - by former attorney, who is trying to force payment from exempt funds. Friday will mark fifth appearance. Hopefully, I'll be allowed to speak. The situation I find myself in shouldn't even be possible, much less dragging out with no end in sight, for years. I've done nothing wrong, but am watching a lot of wrong being accomplished under court jurisdiction; only because I was married to someone who wanted and was granted a divorce (but was not willing to assume the responsibilities that come with granting the divorce). In fact, the recalcitrant party was enriched by well over $100k, although it was necessarily split with other actors. Pro bono help? It's a nice dream ... but that's all it is, for too many. Meanwhile, injustice marches on.

  3. Both sites mentioned in the article appear to be nonfunctional to date (March 28, 2017). http://indianalegalanswers.org/ returns a message stating the "server is taking too long to respond" and http://www.abafreelegalasnswers.org/ "can't find the server". Although this does not surprise me, it is disheartening to know that access to the judicial branch of government remains out of reach for too many citizens (for procedural rather than meritorious reasons) of Indiana. Any updates regarding this story?

  4. I've been denied I appeal court date took a year my court date was Nov 9,2016 and have not received a answer yet

  5. Warsaw indiana dcs lying on our case. We already proved that in our first and most recent court appearance i need people to contact me who have evidence of dcs malpractice please email or facebook nathaniel hollett thank you

ADVERTISEMENT