Wellness while you work

November 9, 2011
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What’s the best way to fit working out into your workday? Work out while you work.

Personal fitness and wellness for lawyers is getting a big push from the new Indiana State Bar Association President C. Erik Chickedantz. Chickedantz has created a wellness committee and is encouraging those in the legal community to be proactive when it comes to their health. You can read more about Chickedantz and his wellness initiative in the latest issue of Indiana Lawyer.

Reporter Jenny Montgomery spoke to several attorneys, as well as a professor at Indiana University's School of Medicine, to get tips for working out and eating healthy and to see how busy lawyers fit working out into their schedules. Just as this issue of the newspaper was getting ready to be published, I received an email about a treadmill desk.

If you haven’t seen one before, the name says it all – it’s a desk placed over a treadmill. Based on the picture in the email, it doesn’t seem like anything special and looks like a U-shaped folding table. But it got me thinking – who would use it? Can you really type a brief or do legal research while walking or running on the treadmill? If you really were working out hard, how many showers would you have to take in a day? Can you imagine a judge walking on a treadmill behind the bench during trial?

Has anyone else seen treadmill desks, or better yet, has anyone ever used it? If I had my own office with a door, I could see possibly using it. But could you imagine if you had five or 10 of these going at the same time in one workspace? I think it would be distracting, but at least the employees would be healthier.
 

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  • Desks
    The treadmill desk isn't designed to have people running full speed while working. Instead, it promotes walking at a very slow pace while you work. By the end of the day, you've walked a couple of miles (or more). You (probably) don't break a sweat, but it keeps the heart working because merely standing up increases your pulse substantially. The slight walk just keeps you going. All-in-all, a pretty effective way to workout at work, assuming you can get your firm to put one in your office.
  • Treadmill Desks for Attorneys
    Hi Jennifer,

    It might interest you to know that attorneys make up the single largest profession of TrekDesk treadmill desk users. We are the manufacturers of the TrekDesk and attorneys seemed to grasp the concept of walking and working quicker than anyone. Perhaps this is because they are more independent in thinking by nature and educated on a wider berth of topics than many occupations. We have videos featuring attorneys on our website along with news write ups. Should you want to do a more in-depth story, please contact us. By the way, you do not sweat walking slowly with a treadmill desk and cognitive abilities and productivity are actually enhanced. We can fill you in on all of the studies if you are interested. Thanks for spreading the word. America needs to get moving again.

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  1. Based on several recent Indy Star articles, I would agree that being a case worker would be really hard. You would see the worst of humanity on a daily basis; and when things go wrong guess who gets blamed??!! Not biological parent!! Best of luck to those who entered that line of work.

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  3. Don't believe me, listen to Pacino: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6bC9w9cH-M

  4. Law school is social control the goal to produce a social product. As such it began after the Revolution and has nearly ruined us to this day: "“Scarcely any political question arises in the United States which is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question. Hence all parties are obliged to borrow, in their daily controversies, the ideas, and even the language, peculiar to judicial proceedings. As most public men [i.e., politicians] are, or have been, legal practitioners, they introduce the customs and technicalities of their profession into the management of public affairs. The jury extends this habitude to all classes. The language of the law thus becomes, in some measure, a vulgar tongue; the spirit of the law, which is produced in the schools and courts of justice, gradually penetrates beyond their walls into the bosom of society, where it descends to the lowest classes, so that at last the whole people contract the habits and the tastes of the judicial magistrate.” ? Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America

  5. Attorney? Really? Or is it former attorney? Status with the Ind St Ct? Status with federal court, with SCOTUS? This is a legal newspaper, or should I look elsewhere?

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