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Five indicted on Medicaid fraud charges

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Federal prosecutors this week indicted five people and three affiliated companies on charges of defrauding Medicaid of millions of dollars, according to the office of U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Indiana David Capp.
 
Roy Dunn and Kahley Vergon-Mayotte of Winimac and Anthony Bitterling of Monticello, owners and/or employees of Hoosier EMS ambulance service of Buffalo, Ind., were charged in one of two indictments handed down this week in Hammond.

A grand jury claims that the defendants submitted false claims for ambulance services for dialysis patients totaling at least $2 million between May 2009 and March 2012. Hoosier EMS either falsified claims submitted to Medicaid or submitted claims for patients who were capable of transporting themselves, according to the indictment.

The four-count indictment seeks criminal sentences as well as a money judgment, forfeiture of more than 40 vehicles owned by the company, and forfeiture of property in northern Indiana that is owned by the principals and valued at more than $400,000.

Charged with health care fraud in a separate indictment were Austin Nwaka, dba Service Above Self, of Camby, and Phyllis Lark, dba Absolute Care, of Hammond.  Lark was also charged with making false statements to a federal agent.
 
The five-count indictment returned by a grand jury alleges that Lark bilked Medicaid of more than $1.9 million for claims of providing targeted case management to 900 Medicaid recipients when she was not authorized to bill for those services, which include locating, managing, coordinating and monitoring proposed services for eligible recipients. Lark is accused in some cases of billing more than 24 hours per day.

Nwaka is accused of using his valid Indiana Medicaid provider ID number to bill for more than $1.3 million in services he was not authorized to provide, according to the indictment. The pair also “used Medicaid recipients’ unique Indiana Medicaid recipient numbers without (their) knowledge or permission … to submit fraudulent claims.” The indictment seeks criminal sentences and asset forfeiture.

Charges were filed as the result of an investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Indiana Medicaid Fraud Control Unit.  The cases are being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Diane Berkowitz.

 

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  1. Why are all these lawyers yakking to the media about pending matters? Trial by media? What the devil happened to not making extrajudicial statements? The system is falling apart.

  2. It is a sad story indeed as this couple has been only in survival mode, NOT found guilty with Ponzi, shaken down for 5 years and pursued by prosecution that has been ignited by a civil suit with very deep pockets wrenched in their bitterness...It has been said that many of us are breaking an average of 300 federal laws a day without even knowing it. Structuring laws, & civilForfeiture laws are among the scariest that need to be restructured or repealed . These laws were initially created for drug Lords and laundering money and now reach over that line. Here you have a couple that took out their own money, not drug money, not laundering. Yes...Many upset that they lost money...but how much did they make before it all fell apart? No one ask that question? A civil suit against Williams was awarded because he has no more money to fight...they pushed for a break in order...they took all his belongings...even underwear, shoes and clothes? who does that? What allows that? Maybe if you had the picture of him purchasing a jacket at the Goodwill just to go to court the next day...his enemy may be satisfied? But not likely...bitterness is a master. For happy ending lovers, you will be happy to know they have a faith that has changed their world and a solid love that many of us can only dream about. They will spend their time in federal jail for taking their money from their account, but at the end of the day they have loyal friends, a true love and a hope of a new life in time...and none of that can be bought or taken That is the real story.

  3. Could be his email did something especially heinous, really over the top like questioning Ind S.Ct. officials or accusing JLAP of being the political correctness police.

  4. Sounds like overkill to me, too. Do the feds not have enough "real" crime to keep them busy?

  5. We live in the world that has become wider in sense of business and competition. Everything went into the Web in addition to the existing physical global challenges in business. I heard that one of the latest innovations is moving to VDR - cloud-based security-protected repositories. Of course virtual data rooms comparison is required if you want to pick up the best one.

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