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Former Florida chief justice to speak on diversity

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A former chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court, who was on the bench during Bush v. Gore, is the keynote speaker at this year’s President’s Dinner at the Indiana State Bar Association annual meeting in Indianapolis.

Justice Peggy A. Quince was appointed to the Florida Supreme Court in 1998. She will speak about her role serving as a member of the American Bar Association’s Presidential Initiative Commission on Diversity, what’s been learned about diversity in the profession and what the profession must do to be more diverse. This year’s meeting theme is “Diversity in the Legal Profession: The Next Steps.”

Justice Quince was elected and served as chief justice from July 1, 2008, until June 2010. In 1993, she was appointed to the Second District Court of Appeal, the first African-American woman named to any of Florida's five lower appeals courts.

The dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at the Marriott Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. It’s open to the public and pre-registration is encouraged as space is limited. Registrations made today are $60; after today the price is $70.

Justice Quince will also participate in the CLE “Diversity in Appellate Practice,” in which she’ll moderate speakers Indiana Supreme Court Justice Robert Rucker and Indiana Court of Appeals judges Michael Barnes and Elaine Brown. The hour-long CLE begins at 4 p.m. Oct. 14. Only members of the ISBA can attend the CLE.

More information is available on the ISBA’s website.

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  1. A sad end to a prolific gadfly. Indiana has suffered a great loss in the journalistic realm.

  2. Good riddance to this dangerous activist judge

  3. What is the one thing the Hoosier legal status quo hates more than a whistleblower? A lawyer whistleblower taking on the system man to man. That must never be rewarded, must always, always, always be punished, lest the whole rotten tree be felled.

  4. I want to post this to keep this tread alive and hope more of David's former clients might come forward. In my case, this coward of a man represented me from June 2014 for a couple of months before I fired him. I knew something was wrong when he blatantly lied about what he had advised me in my contentious and unfortunate divorce trial. His impact on the proceedings cast a very long shadow and continues to impact me after a lengthy 19 month divorce. I would join a class action suit.

  5. The dispute in LB Indiana regarding lake front property rights is typical of most beach communities along our Great Lakes. Simply put, communication to non owners when visiting the lakefront would be beneficial. The Great Lakes are designated navigational waters (including shorelines). The high-water mark signifies the area one is able to navigate. This means you can walk, run, skip, etc. along the shores. You can't however loiter, camp, sunbath in front of someones property. Informational signs may be helpful to owners and visitors. Our Great Lakes are a treasure that should be enjoyed by all. PS We should all be concerned that the Long Beach, Indiana community is on septic systems.

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