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Former Florida chief justice to speak on diversity

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A former chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court, who was on the bench during Bush v. Gore, is the keynote speaker at this year’s President’s Dinner at the Indiana State Bar Association annual meeting in Indianapolis.

Justice Peggy A. Quince was appointed to the Florida Supreme Court in 1998. She will speak about her role serving as a member of the American Bar Association’s Presidential Initiative Commission on Diversity, what’s been learned about diversity in the profession and what the profession must do to be more diverse. This year’s meeting theme is “Diversity in the Legal Profession: The Next Steps.”

Justice Quince was elected and served as chief justice from July 1, 2008, until June 2010. In 1993, she was appointed to the Second District Court of Appeal, the first African-American woman named to any of Florida's five lower appeals courts.

The dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at the Marriott Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. It’s open to the public and pre-registration is encouraged as space is limited. Registrations made today are $60; after today the price is $70.

Justice Quince will also participate in the CLE “Diversity in Appellate Practice,” in which she’ll moderate speakers Indiana Supreme Court Justice Robert Rucker and Indiana Court of Appeals judges Michael Barnes and Elaine Brown. The hour-long CLE begins at 4 p.m. Oct. 14. Only members of the ISBA can attend the CLE.

More information is available on the ISBA’s website.

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