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Former Indiana appellate deputy clerk dies

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A former deputy clerk for Indiana’s appellate courts died July 5 in Wisconsin from complications following a heart transplant.

David Ray Schanker, 55, served as deputy clerk of the Indiana Supreme Court, Court of Appeals, and Tax Court for seven years until he joined the Wisconsin court system in 2007. Schanker earned his law degree from Indiana University Maurer School of Law – Bloomington and served as judicial clerk for two years to then-Chief Judge John T. Sharpnack of the Court of Appeals in the 1990s. He practiced at Kightlinger & Grey before working for the appellate court.

Judge Sharpnack, now a senior judge, said that Schanker was the first person he ever hired during their job interview. Before his legal career, Schanker – a New Jersey native – worked in theatre and film, earning an MFA in creative writing from Columbia University. He authored several short stories, legal-themed novels, and plays. That experience with language also helped encourage Judge Sharpnack to hire him.

“He was clearly a bright person,” the judge said. “He was extremely helpful, very hard working, very bright, empathetic, and concerned about the people in the cases we were working on.”

While serving as Judge Sharpnack’s clerk, Schanker wrote a mystery about a clerk on the court of appeals. The judge said he was nervous the project, but that it turned out fine.

“He assured me I wasn’t like the character of the judge on the court of appeals,” he said.

Schanker brought computer literacy skills to the court, as well as persuaded Judge Sharpnack to introduce casual Fridays and donuts and conversations on that day. That tradition lasted long after Schanker left, he said.

“He was one of my very best clerks and a person I have a high admiration for,” he said.

Schanker had a heart transplant in March and passed away after developing an infection in his gallbladder at the end of June.

He is survived by his wife, Suzanne Buchko, daughters Inez Chesire Buchko Schanker and Julia Xhikuang Buchko Schanker; sister Beth Hume, and parents Robert and Claire Schanker.•

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  1. Thank you, John Smith, for pointing out a needed correction. The article has been revised.

  2. The "National institute for Justice" is an agency for the Dept of Justice. That is not the law firm you are talking about in this article. The "institute for justice" is a public interest law firm. http://ij.org/ thanks for interesting article however

  3. I would like to try to find a lawyer as soon possible I've had my money stolen off of my bank card driver pressed charges and I try to get the information they need it and a Social Security board is just give me a hold up a run around for no reason and now it think it might be too late cuz its been over a year I believe and I can't get the right information they need because they keep giving me the runaroundwhat should I do about that

  4. It is wonderful that Indiana DOC is making some truly admirable and positive changes. People with serious mental illness, intellectual disability or developmental disability will benefit from these changes. It will be much better if people can get some help and resources that promote their health and growth than if they suffer alone. If people experience positive growth or healing of their health issues, they may be less likely to do the things that caused them to come to prison in the first place. This will be of benefit for everyone. I am also so happy that Indiana DOC added correctional personnel and mental health staffing. These are tough issues to work with. There should be adequate staffing in prisons so correctional officers and other staff are able to do the kind of work they really want to do-helping people grow and change-rather than just trying to manage chaos. Correctional officers and other staff deserve this. It would be great to see increased mental health services and services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities in the community so that fewer people will have to receive help and support in prisons. Community services would like be less expensive, inherently less demeaning and just a whole lot better for everyone.

  5. Can I get this form on line,if not where can I obtain one. I am eligible.

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