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Grand jury indicts recycler for racketeering

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A Marion County grand jury has returned an eight-count indictment against OmniSource Corp., accusing the metal recycling powerhouse of racketeering and receiving stolen property.

OmniSource, a unit of Fort Wayne-based Steel Dynamics Inc., is charged with buying stolen cars, car parts, boats, gutters, wiring and other items as scrap metal prices climbed between June 2007 and May 2009.

In a statement, OmniSource president Mark Millett called the allegations "unfounded," saying the company is an industry leader in "anti-theft training and law enforcement cooperation." The company hired more than 50 Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department officers to help detect and deter metal theft.

"This indictment of OmniSource is not only unfair to the company but an insult to the IMPD police officers who ... did their part to stop metal thefts in Marion County,” he said in the statement.

Officers from the IMPD, FBI, Indiana State Police and other agencies raided the six Indianapolis scrap yards operated by OmniSource in February 2009, collecting evidence and seizing property and more than $277,000. The raids were the culmination of a year-long undercover investigation.

The grand jury returned the 16-page indictment Oct. 22, and it was filed in Marion Circuit Court on Monday.

OmniSource is charged with three counts of corrupt business influence and five counts of attempted receipt of stolen property. The indictment details dozens of allegations, which Millett said the company will "aggressively" defend itself against.

This month, the company sued Marion County Prosecutor Carl Brizzi, seeking the return of the seized cash. OmniSource said the investigation was a sham intended to raise Brizzi’s political profile.  

As IBJ reported in April, the Prosecutor’s Office missed a deadline to file forfeiture paperwork, likely paving the way for OmniSource to reclaim the money.

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  1. Paul Ogden doing a fine job of remembering his peer Gary Welsh with the post below and a call for an Indy gettogether to celebrate Gary .... http://www.ogdenonpolitics.com/2016/05/indiana-loses-citizen-journalist-giant.html Castaways of Indiana, unite!

  2. It's unfortunate that someone has attempted to hijack the comments to promote his own business. This is not an article discussing the means of preserving the record; no matter how it's accomplished, ethics and impartiality are paramount concerns. When a party to litigation contracts directly with a reporting firm, it creates, at the very least, the appearance of a conflict of interest. Court reporters, attorneys and judges are officers of the court and must abide by court rules as well as state and federal laws. Parties to litigation have no such ethical responsibilities. Would we accept insurance companies contracting with judges? This practice effectively shifts costs to the party who can least afford it while reducing costs for the party with the most resources. The success of our justice system depends on equal access for all, not just for those who have the deepest pockets.

  3. As a licensed court reporter in California, I have to say that I'm sure that at some point we will be replaced by speech recognition. However, from what I've seen of it so far, it's a lot farther away than three years. It doesn't sound like Mr. Hubbard has ever sat in a courtroom or a deposition room where testimony is being given. Not all procedures are the same, and often they become quite heated with the ends of question and beginning of answers overlapping. The human mind can discern the words to a certain extent in those cases, but I doubt very much that a computer can yet. There is also the issue of very heavy accents and mumbling. People speak very fast nowadays, and in order to do that, they generally slur everything together, they drop or swallow words like "the" and "and." Voice recognition might be able to produce some form of a transcript, but I'd be very surprised if it produces an accurate or verbatim transcript, as is required in the legal world.

  4. Really enjoyed the profile. Congratulations to Craig on living the dream, and kudos to the pros who got involved to help him realize the vision.

  5. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

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