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Hammerle On … 'Elysium' and 'Blackfish'

Robert Hammerle
August 28, 2013
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bob hammerle movie reviews“Elysium”

In Director Neill Blomkamp’s initial hit, “District 9” (2009), he took a startling look at the consequences of apartheid in South Africa, this time seen through the eyes of segregated, crustacean-like aliens trapped on Earth. With “Elysium,” we are catapulted forward to 2154 and an Earth that has been left in massive disarray. The wealthy and powerful have fled to a luxurious orbiting space station known as Elysium, while the remaining riffraff on a decaying Earth are left to battle for a menial existence.

Matt Damon plays Max, an ex-con trying to earn a meager living in a factory where any semblance of unions has been left in history’s dust. Suffering exposure to radiation poisoning that threatens his life, he is forced to seek a way to Elysium where medical facilities have evolved to effectively make humans immortal.

In the process, Max agrees to undergo a massive surgical process that attaches steel braces to his back and arms, not to mention a computer implant in his brain. If he wants a trip to Elysium, he has to help a benevolent underworld figure known as Spider (Wagner Moura) who is seeking a way to break Elysium’s code and bring equality back to the Earth.

What ensues is Max’s conflict with Elysium and its deadly robot henchmen on Earth. A massive anti-immigration policy exists on the circling station, and any intruding suspect is immediately killed. Jody Foster plays Delacourt, a heartless cabinet leader of Elysium’s government.hammerle
The suspense in the film builds rapidly and focuses on three superb performances by supporting actors. Sharito Copley, who was also fantastic in the above-referred to “District 9,” plays Kruger, a violent, cursing hitman doing Delacourt’s dirty work on Earth.

While Diego Luna embraces his role as Julio, Max’s devoted friend, Alice Braga steals the movie as Frey, Max’s friend from childhood. Now a nurse on Earth, she is desperately trying to get her leukemia-stricken daughter to Elysium for a cure.

What Mr. Blomkamp has created is an Earth where the wealthy care only about the wealthy. If global warming has destroyed our environment, so be it. Let the poor and the oppressed care for themselves, as that is their problem, not the nation’s. All that is needed is an ideal place to live and a robotic police force on Earth that will harshly maintain order.

In Stanley Kubrick’s “Paths of Glory” (1957), the powerful governments on this planet learned nothing after killing over 10 million young men in five years. The well-to-do, powerful politicians in Washington today proudly embrace Christianity on one hand while simultaneously ignoring Christ’s words of “Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.”

Mr. Blomkamp remembers that contradiction and it would be wise for us to do the same.
“Blackfish”

“Blackfish” exposes in dramatic, touching fashion the exploitation of Orca whales by the moguls running our billion-dollar national entertainment industry, and it simply cannot be missed. This documentary forces you to consider how these intelligent ocean creatures survive while confined for life in small aquatic facilities.

Told with the cooperation of multiple ex-trainers, “Blackfish” exposes this ongoing tragedy. Originally called Blackfish by Native Americans, the viewer soon learns that Orcas spend their entire lives at sea in a family community. Their lifespan generally reflects that of humans, and offspring stay in the company of their mothers for their entire lives. Additionally, their intelligence and communication skills are still being analyzed, and their attachment to each other is inspiring.

Though it has now been banned in the waters off of the United States, there are still whales in Sea World-type facilities that were captured as young calves at sea. One of the aging, grizzled participants in this brutal folly literally cried without shame while describing how Orca mothers refused to flee to safety when their offspring were captured in nets. I am certain that you will react the same way.
hammerle For reasons that are all too apparent, the largest fin of all the males droops noticeably in captivity, something that you seldom see in the oceans. You don’t have to guess why.

The bottom line is that these whales are kept penned up in facilities so that young kids can look on with awe and buy stuffed replicas as they leave. The effect is exactly the same as if we kept children locked in a 10-foot-square cell enclosed with glass at a mall so that people could pay to see how cute they are, not to mention how they like to play with their “trainers.”

However, it was the death in 2010 of Dawn Brancheau at Orlando’s Sea World that brought temporary focus on to this monstrosity. She was a recognized expert, loved by families and co-workers alike. There is actual film footage of the moment when Tilikum dragged her into the water by her arm, proceeding to then viciously demolish her. This was the third human Tilikum has killed in over 20 years of captivity, much of it in isolation, and you are left weeping for him as much as his victims.

Ironically, my wife, Monica Foster, and I just spent a week in the San Juan islands off the Washington coast. On a small raft we sat transfixed as we witnessed several pods of Orcas swim majestically near us. The thought of these intelligent creatures being kept in captivity remains heartbreaking.

As one of the ex-trainers said on film, 50 years from now this abhorrent process will have long ended, and those citizens will be wondering how their ancestors could have allowed it to happen at all. It is time to return these gorgeous creatures to the sea.•

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Robert Hammerle practices criminal law in Indianapolis. To read more of his reviews, visit www.bigmouthbobs.com. The opinions expressed are those of the author.

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  1. I have been on this program while on parole from 2011-2013. No person should be forced mentally to share private details of their personal life with total strangers. Also giving permission for a mental therapist to report to your parole agent that your not participating in group therapy because you don't have the financial mean to be in the group therapy. I was personally singled out and sent back three times for not having money and also sent back within the six month when you aren't to be sent according to state law. I will work to het this INSOMM's removed from this state. I also had twelve or thirteen parole agents with a fifteen month period. Thanks for your time.

  2. Our nation produces very few jurists of the caliber of Justice DOUGLAS and his peers these days. Here is that great civil libertarian, who recognized government as both a blessing and, when corrupted by ideological interests, a curse: "Once the investigator has only the conscience of government as a guide, the conscience can become ‘ravenous,’ as Cromwell, bent on destroying Thomas More, said in Bolt, A Man For All Seasons (1960), p. 120. The First Amendment mirrors many episodes where men, harried and harassed by government, sought refuge in their conscience, as these lines of Thomas More show: ‘MORE: And when we stand before God, and you are sent to Paradise for doing according to your conscience, *575 and I am damned for not doing according to mine, will you come with me, for fellowship? ‘CRANMER: So those of us whose names are there are damned, Sir Thomas? ‘MORE: I don't know, Your Grace. I have no window to look into another man's conscience. I condemn no one. ‘CRANMER: Then the matter is capable of question? ‘MORE: Certainly. ‘CRANMER: But that you owe obedience to your King is not capable of question. So weigh a doubt against a certainty—and sign. ‘MORE: Some men think the Earth is round, others think it flat; it is a matter capable of question. But if it is flat, will the King's command make it round? And if it is round, will the King's command flatten it? No, I will not sign.’ Id., pp. 132—133. DOUGLAS THEN WROTE: Where government is the Big Brother,11 privacy gives way to surveillance. **909 But our commitment is otherwise. *576 By the First Amendment we have staked our security on freedom to promote a multiplicity of ideas, to associate at will with kindred spirits, and to defy governmental intrusion into these precincts" Gibson v. Florida Legislative Investigation Comm., 372 U.S. 539, 574-76, 83 S. Ct. 889, 908-09, 9 L. Ed. 2d 929 (1963) Mr. Justice DOUGLAS, concurring. I write: Happy Memorial Day to all -- God please bless our fallen who lived and died to preserve constitutional governance in our wonderful series of Republics. And God open the eyes of those government officials who denounce the constitutions of these Republics by arbitrary actions arising out capricious motives.

  3. From back in the day before secularism got a stranglehold on Hoosier jurists comes this great excerpt via Indiana federal court judge Allan Sharp, dedicated to those many Indiana government attorneys (with whom I have dealt) who count the law as a mere tool, an optional tool that is not to be used when political correctness compels a more acceptable result than merely following the path that the law directs: ALLEN SHARP, District Judge. I. In a scene following a visit by Henry VIII to the home of Sir Thomas More, playwriter Robert Bolt puts the following words into the mouths of his characters: Margaret: Father, that man's bad. MORE: There is no law against that. ROPER: There is! God's law! MORE: Then God can arrest him. ROPER: Sophistication upon sophistication! MORE: No, sheer simplicity. The law, Roper, the law. I know what's legal not what's right. And I'll stick to what's legal. ROPER: Then you set man's law above God's! MORE: No, far below; but let me draw your attention to a fact I'm not God. The currents and eddies of right and wrong, which you find such plain sailing, I can't navigate. I'm no voyager. But in the thickets of law, oh, there I'm a forester. I doubt if there's a man alive who could follow me there, thank God... ALICE: (Exasperated, pointing after Rich) While you talk, he's gone! MORE: And go he should, if he was the Devil himself, until he broke the law! ROPER: So now you'd give the Devil benefit of law! MORE: Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil? ROPER: I'd cut down every law in England to do that! MORE: (Roused and excited) Oh? (Advances on Roper) And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned round on you where would you hide, Roper, the laws being flat? (He leaves *1257 him) This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast man's laws, not God's and if you cut them down and you're just the man to do it d'you really think you would stand upright in the winds that would blow then? (Quietly) Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake. ROPER: I have long suspected this; this is the golden calf; the law's your god. MORE: (Wearily) Oh, Roper, you're a fool, God's my god... (Rather bitterly) But I find him rather too (Very bitterly) subtle... I don't know where he is nor what he wants. ROPER: My God wants service, to the end and unremitting; nothing else! MORE: (Dryly) Are you sure that's God! He sounds like Moloch. But indeed it may be God And whoever hunts for me, Roper, God or Devil, will find me hiding in the thickets of the law! And I'll hide my daughter with me! Not hoist her up the mainmast of your seagoing principles! They put about too nimbly! (Exit More. They all look after him). Pgs. 65-67, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS A Play in Two Acts, Robert Bolt, Random House, New York, 1960. Linley E. Pearson, Atty. Gen. of Indiana, Indianapolis, for defendants. Childs v. Duckworth, 509 F. Supp. 1254, 1256 (N.D. Ind. 1981) aff'd, 705 F.2d 915 (7th Cir. 1983)

  4. "Meanwhile small- and mid-size firms are getting squeezed and likely will not survive unless they become a boutique firm." I've been a business attorney in small, and now mid-size firm for over 30 years, and for over 30 years legal consultants have been preaching this exact same mantra of impending doom for small and mid-sized firms -- verbatim. This claim apparently helps them gin up merger opportunities from smaller firms who become convinced that they need to become larger overnight. The claim that large corporations are interested in cost-saving and efficiency has likewise been preached for decades, and is likewise bunk. If large corporations had any real interest in saving money they wouldn't use large law firms whose rates are substantially higher than those of high-quality mid-sized firms.

  5. The family is the foundation of all human government. That is the Grand Design. Modern governments throw off this Design and make bureaucratic war against the family, as does Hollywood and cultural elitists such as third wave feminists. Since WWII we have been on a ship of fools that way, with both the elite and government and their social engineering hacks relentlessly attacking the very foundation of social order. And their success? See it in the streets of Fergusson, on the food stamp doles (mostly broken families)and in the above article. Reject the Grand Design for true social function, enter the Glorious State to manage social dysfunction. Our Brave New World will be a prison camp, and we will welcome it as the only way to manage given the anarchy without it.

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