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Hebenstreit: Another Reason to be Proud of Indy

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IBA-hebenstreit“It’s a new track record!” I can still hear that deep, deliberate, and excited voice of the late Tom Carnegie over the loudspeaker at the Speedway. We all instantly knew that familiar and iconic voice announcing the new speed record of the likes of Mears, Andretti, Luyendyk, or Fittipaldi as they flew around that two and one half mile oval. It was even more recognizable than the voice of Jim Nabors singing “Back Home Again in Indiana.”

My love of the Indy 500 began in high school when I sold programs at the Speedway. My Dad would get up about 3 a.m. to drive me all the way across town so I could be there on time to sell the $2 programs. In addition to the economic incentive, the draw for me was that we all had total access to the Motor Speedway and could stay and watch the racing. Over the years, I discovered most of the nooks and crannies of the world’s greatest race course. In the intervening forty plus years, I have only missed the Greatest Spectacle in Racing a handful of times. It has become a tradition.

In Indy, we are quite fortunate to have such a magnificent facility as the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. It is hard to believe that such a huge venue is only about 5 miles from the heart of downtown. This year the Speedway is celebrating the Centennial of the Indy 500. As with most other sports, the motorsports industry has grown and changed considerably. Racing used to be a barn storming event loosely held on weekend afternoons. Watching AJ Foyt over the years, I wondered if the day would come that he would not be able to squeeze into the cockpit. Now the drivers are as physically fit as Olympic athletes. Just as the technical engineering and physicality of the drivers have changed, so have the business and legal aspects of the growing sport.

In mid April, the IndyBar is co-hosting a great racing event. TRAC, the acronym of The Racing Attorney Conference, will take place at the Conrad Hotel on April 13 and 14th. IndyBar member, Wes Zirkle serves as Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Just Marketing International. If you read the IBJ, you surely have seen many articles about Just Marketing due to its high profile work in sports marketing and particularly in the motorsports industry. Several years ago, Wes was in Toronto at a conference for the Sports Lawyers Association. Over the years, Wes had become friends with many sports lawyers across the country including Brooke Beyer, Jr., the Assistant General Counsel of NASCAR located in Charlotte, North Carolina, and Stoke Caldwell, Jr,. a Charlotte motorsports attorney. During that conference, these three decided that most sports conferences did not sufficiently address motorsports. They decided to host a dedicated motorsports law conference and attract the biggest names in the motorsports world. They then recruited William Bray from Charlotte and Mark Richards from Indianapolis to join them. TRAC was born.

The group decided that the venue would alternate on a yearly basis between Charlotte and Indianapolis. The first conference was held at the Charlotte Motor Speedway while, coincidentally, the roar of engines often overtook the speakers as testing was simultaneously occurring. The following year the event was held in the press room of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, impressing many of the out-of-state attendees who had never been to our iconic speedway. Indianapolis is fortunate to host the conference again this year but the size of the crowd as well as the acoustics and room configuration made the Conrad a better location for the event.

In addition to being a very effective networking opportunity for the leaders of the sports and motorsports world, the conference features first class educational CLE presentations. The topics covered are fascinating and wide ranging. They include preparing your driver for opportunities outside the race car, dealing with state and local governments, obtaining injunctive relief in motorsports transactions, as well as new aspects of sports licensing and sponsorship. The presenters are a “who’s who” of the most noted and respected leaders in the sports racing industry from all over the country They are attorneys, corporate sponsors, team representatives as well as leaders of the various racing organizing bodies such as IndyCar and NASCAR. Attendees range from corporate leaders and attorneys to “mom and pop” dirt track racers who want to be better informed.

TRAC is co-presented by the IndyBar and the North Carolina Bar Association. Although Indy and Charlotte compete for some of the same clients and sponsors, the group has worked very well together to raise the level of awareness and information about Motorsports Law and the industry as well. If registration continues to go as well as expected, this year, the conference will set “a new track record.”•

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  1. Im very happy for you, getting ready to go down that dirt road myself, and im praying for the same outcome, because it IS sometimes in the childs best interest to have visitation with grandparents. Thanks for sharing, needed to hear some positive posts for once.

  2. Been there 4 months with 1 paycheck what can i do

  3. our hoa has not communicated any thing that takes place in their "executive meetings" not executive session. They make decisions in these meetings, do not have an agenda, do not notify association memebers and do not keep general meetings minutes. They do not communicate info of any kind to the member, except annual meeting, nobody attends or votes because they think the board is self serving. They keep a deposit fee from club house rental for inspection after someone uses it, there is no inspection I know becausee I rented it, they did not disclose to members that board memebers would be keeping this money, I know it is only 10 dollars but still it is not their money, they hire from within the board for paid positions, no advertising and no request for bids from anyone else, I atteended last annual meeting, went into executive session to elect officers in that session the president brought up the motion to give the secretary a raise of course they all agreed they hired her in, then the minutes stated that a diffeerent board member motioned to give this raise. This board is very clickish and has done things anyway they pleased for over 5 years, what recourse to members have to make changes in the boards conduct

  4. Where may I find an attorney working Pro Bono? Many issues with divorce, my Disability, distribution of IRA's, property, money's and pressured into agreement by my attorney. Leaving me far less than 5% of all after 15 years of marriage. No money to appeal, disabled living on disability income. Attorney's decision brought forward to judge, no evidence ever to finalize divorce. Just 2 weeks ago. Please help.

  5. For the record no one could answer the equal protection / substantive due process challenge I issued in the first post below. The lawless and accountable only to power bureaucrats never did either. All who interface with the Indiana law examiners or JLAP be warned.

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