ILNews

Help Others and Get Free CLE: IndyBar to Co-Host Pro Bono Trainings

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

The IndyBar Pro Bono Standing Committee, along with other legal and community organizations, will co-host two pro bono program trainings in the coming weeks. These trainings, which include continuing legal education credit, can be taken at no cost with a commitment to take on pro bono cases.

Project GRACE Training: Nov. 8

The IndyBar Pro Bono Standing Committee, the Marion County Bar Association and the Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic (NCLC) will co-sponsor a training session for the NCLC’s Project GRACE on Friday, Nov. 8 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Broadway United Methodist Church (609 E. 29th St.). Project GRACE works with individuals with criminal histories, with the main focus is on assisting those who have recently been released or are soon to be released.

The training will include 6.0 CLE credits. Attorneys who volunteer to take two Project GRACE cases can attend this seminar at no cost. Otherwise, the cost is $160 for attendees or $75 for non-profit organizations. To register for the training, visit http://graceseminar2013.eventbrite.com.

Economic Justice CLE: Nov. 14

The Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic, in partnership with Barnes & Thornburg LLP and the Indianapolis Bar Association will presents an Economic Justice Continuing Legal Education Seminar on Thursday, Nov. 14 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Barnes & Thornburg LLP, 11 South Meridian Street. The program, which includes 6 CLE credits, is free to attorneys willing to take one pro bono case referral. Go to https://economicseminar2013.eventbrite.com to register.

This training seminar will educate attorneys about the legal issues that the low income population faces on a regular basis, including federal tax issues, a crash course on Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, collection defensive and the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Also covered will be mortgage foreclosure defense and housing counseling options. An hour will be devoted to the ethical obligations as they relate to representing low-income clients and the Rules of Professional Responsibility.

Training the Immigrant Volunteer: Dec. 5

The Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic in partnership with Faegre Baker Daniels LLP, the Indianapolis Bar Association & the Immigrant Welcome Center presents “Training the Immigrant Volunteer,” an immigrant justice continuing legal education seminar on Thursday, Dec. 5th, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. This program, which includes 6 CLE credits, is offered at no cost to attorneys willing to take a pro bono case referral. Go to https://immigrantseminar2013.eventbrite.com/ to register.

This seminar will begin with an introduction of the basic vocabulary and ideas behind immigration law so the attendee will better understand the remainder of the CLE. Speakers will present on topics such as the Adjustment of Status Application, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, Family Unification and an introduction to Consular Processing for Immigrant Visa Applicants. Cultural Sensitivity Training will be included as well as Ethics and Rule 3.3 and what is the duty to report if clients disclose information about immigration fraud.

Victim Justice CLE: Dec. 13

The Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic, in partnership with The Julian Center & the Indianapolis Bar Association will present a Victim Justice Continuing Legal Education Seminar on Friday, Dec. 13 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Julian Center, 2011 N. Meridian St. This program, which includes 6 CLE credits, is offered at no cost to attorneys willing to take a pro bono case referral. Visit https://victimseminar2013.eventbrite.com to register.

Attendees will learn about immigration remedies for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault and other violent crimes, focusing on U-visas and VAWA self-petitions. Attendees will learn skills for working with victims of domestic violence to make sure they receive support and resources they need to recover. The critical importance of the use of expert witnesses in trials to explain the abused/survivor’s behavior will be taught, as will the rights that children have as victims. Immigrant victims often get into trouble by using a notario and the impact on these cases will be presented. Indiana Code 32-31-9, covering the rights of tenants who are victims of particular crimes will also be addressed.•
 

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. I was looking through some of your blog posts on this internet site and I conceive this web site is rattling informative ! Keep on posting . dfkcfdkdgbekdffe

  2. Don't believe me, listen to Pacino: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6bC9w9cH-M

  3. Law school is social control the goal to produce a social product. As such it began after the Revolution and has nearly ruined us to this day: "“Scarcely any political question arises in the United States which is not resolved, sooner or later, into a judicial question. Hence all parties are obliged to borrow, in their daily controversies, the ideas, and even the language, peculiar to judicial proceedings. As most public men [i.e., politicians] are, or have been, legal practitioners, they introduce the customs and technicalities of their profession into the management of public affairs. The jury extends this habitude to all classes. The language of the law thus becomes, in some measure, a vulgar tongue; the spirit of the law, which is produced in the schools and courts of justice, gradually penetrates beyond their walls into the bosom of society, where it descends to the lowest classes, so that at last the whole people contract the habits and the tastes of the judicial magistrate.” ? Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America

  4. Attorney? Really? Or is it former attorney? Status with the Ind St Ct? Status with federal court, with SCOTUS? This is a legal newspaper, or should I look elsewhere?

  5. Once again Indiana has not only shown what little respect it has for animals, but how little respect it has for the welfare of the citizens of the state. Dumping manure in a pond will most certainly pollute the environment and ground water. Who thought of this spiffy plan? No doubt the livestock industry. So all the citizens of Indiana have to suffer pollution for the gain of a few livestock producers who are only concerned about their own profits at the expense of everyone else who lives in this State. Shame on the Environmental Rules Board!

ADVERTISEMENT