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Hemp's growing pains in Indiana

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Industrial hemp was legalized in Indiana when Gov. Mike Pence signed a bill into law this year, but you still can’t grow the crop in the Hoosier State.

Legal in Canada, Europe, China and elsewhere, hemp’s resurgence is evidenced by commercial products from food to fuel to clothes to auto parts. But because hemp is the same genus as marijuana – cannabis sativa – federal regulators criminalized its cultivation decades ago. Now, federal agencies are loath to permit new crops, even though 13 states have approved some form of hemp legalization.

hemp-1-15col.jpg Although legal, no hemp has been planted yet in Indiana. (Shutterstock.com)

“It’s not like hemp is not grown around the world, and it’s certainly well known we could grow hemp in Indiana,” said state Sen. Richard D. Young, D-Milltown, sponsor of the industrial hemp bill that sailed through the General Assembly with wide bipartisan support. “There was really no reason it should have ever been illegal to begin with. I think it’s kind of a miraculous commodity, and it’s foolish we don’t use it.”

Legalization of industrial hemp in Indiana is enshrined in I.C. 15-15-13. Hemp is defined as cannabis whose concentration of the psychoactive ingredient tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is less than 0.3 percent of the plant’s weight. The statute sets out a system in which growers and handlers would have to submit to background checks and be licensed by the state. Hemp fields would be subject to compliance inspection by state police.

But no commercial licenses are expected to be available anytime soon, according to people involved in setting up the regulatory framework.

The law vests in the Indiana seed commissioner authority for regulating hemp. Two days after Pence signed the bill into law in March, State Chemist and Seed Commissioner Robert Waltz sent a letter to the Drug Enforcement Administration seeking to clear the way for research on the plant that he hopes will be carried out by Purdue University.

“The (2013) Farm Bill very clearly limits the growth of this crop to research purposes with state departments of agriculture or universities conducting research,” Waltz said. “The federal government still sees this very much as a crop that they want to see and need to see highly regulated.

“The DEA clearly regards any growth of this crop outside of what’s allowed in the Farm Bill as an illegal activity,” he said.

young Young

Hearing nothing from the DEA five months after requesting clearance to proceed with research crops next spring, Waltz submitted a second letter Aug. 19. That was one day after proponents and stakeholders in the fledgling hemp industry gathered and talked about prospects for the industry in Indiana.

“We definitely want seed in the ground in the spring, but it will have to be limited per the Farm Bill,” said Jamie Campbell, founder and president of the Indiana Hemp Industries Association. “It just may not be as aggressive as some people would like.”

Campbell said that while regulatory approval is slow, she’s optimistic that one of several bills in Congress will pass, lifting restrictions on cultivating hemp. There are manufacturers in Indiana who are using the plant’s fiber or seeds, “but we’re pulling it from every other country.”

When she testified before a legislative committee considering the hemp bill, Campbell brought bags full of a variety of items made from the plant that were purchased in local department stores and shops. She said that helped alleviate one of the biggest problems advocates face in winning over skeptics.

“So many people do not know the difference between marijuana and industrial hemp,” she said. “Part two is, everyone is concerned about knowing the difference.”

Campbell said that hemp is distinguishable from marijuana largely based on size. Hemp may grow to heights of 12 to 16 feet, whereas cannabis grown for marijuana typically is much smaller.

Hemp continues to grow wild around the state, she said, eluding eradication efforts. The plants are a remnant of a time when the U.S. government paid farmers to cultivate the crop to make rope and other products used by the armed forces during World War II.

Waltz said authorities today worry, though, that a hemp field could provide cover for planting marijuana. “The concern is … it would be seen as the same plant,” he said.

“Those are probably the kinds of issues that are going to restrict the plant until we come to some resolution with how we’re going to manage some of those scenarios,” Waltz said.

Indiana’s hemp statute states that enabling the crop will in no way violate federal law – something that happened when Colorado legalized marijuana for recreational purposes.

“Even during testimony, we had some people coming in testifying for it because they perceived this would be a precursor to legalizing marijuana,” Young said. “We tried to shut them down. … I have no support for marijuana legalization whatsoever.”

A farmer, Young also has no interest in growing hemp himself, but he said farmers shouldn’t be denied the option of growing a potentially lucrative crop. He said some farmers in Canada, for example, earn about $1,100 per acre they grow of hemp versus about $900 for corn, soybeans or other grain commodities. But no one expects hemp production will ever come close to matching Indiana’s corn or soybean harvests.

“The actual big value of industrial hemp is not going to be in agriculture, it’s going to be in manufacturing,” Young said. It’s a value-added crop that can be made into an estimated 50,000 products, he explained, and states that have a regulatory system and some experience with the crop will be positioned to take advantage.

Young said it’s important that Indiana be out front in the industry because manufacturers are likely to locate close to the product, because the cost of transport is one of the greatest expenses for makers of hemp products.

Kentucky, which legalized hemp in 2013, this year harvested its first pilot project research crops, but the state had to go to court as it prepared to expand cultivation. The state sued the DEA after Kentucky officials said the agency delayed authorizing planting and then seized hemp seeds that were bound for the Bluegrass State.

This month, Kentucky dropped its suit after the state and DEA agreed on a process for importing seed and that Kentucky’s Department of Agriculture would oversee the cultivation and sale of the crop.

Young doesn’t expect the federal government would take steps to stop cultivation of hemp even in states such as Colorado that have openly defied prohibition. Key leaders in both parties in Congress appear to favor decriminalizing cultivation, he said.

“I think the time will come when you won’t have to have a license and anyone can contract with a manufacturer if you want to grow it. The way (marijuana and hemp) have been bundled together, I think it’s almost criminal,” Young added, noting the irony that some of the nation’s founding documents were drafted on hemp paper.

“We’ve been denied a whole world of products that we could be making out of this that are superior to materials we are using right now, and they are in every case better for the environment,” he said.•

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  • Smoking Cannabis
    Laboratory tests show smoking Cannabis is 30% efficient to convert THCA into THC. This means a "High-Potency" strain with 20% THCA will deliver approximately 6% on conversion. The ESTABLISHMENT cannot have Prohibition Repealed because when conversions exceed 50% and begin to approach 100% REAL medical results will abound. Think of it this way. For three (3) years Genetic Science has known there is No THC in Cannabis. Yet, Rep. Young "scripted" into the S.B. 357 S.E.A. 357 that Hemp does produce THC: "...industrial hemp in Indiana is enshrined in I.C. 15-15-13. Hemp is defined as cannabis whose concentration of the psychoactive ingredient tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is less than 0.3 percent of the plant’s weight" This is called: "Plausible Deniability" Now when ANY politician is asked about the fact there is no THC in Hemp, they will tell us: "It says so right there in the law..." When a lie is written into the law, the the law is a lie. It is time to Repeal Hemp Prohibition and get Hoosiers working again.
  • Cannabis does not produce THC.
    Hemp CANNOT produce THC (not low amounts, not trace amounts, nada, none, zilch, zero.) Don't believe their Kindergarten antics in the face of modern genetics. In 2011, over 30,000 Cannabis & Hemp genes were mapped. The Genetic result is neither Cannabis, nor Hemp have THC in their bio-synthetic pathway. The Chemical result is... Neither Cannabis, nor Hemp produce THC. Jack Herer 1, Hemp's alleged "high-THC by Dry Weight" cousin had a whopping "0.48% THC by D.W." I hate to inform this reporter but the THC-narrative no longer exists. In the face of Scientific and Genetic Facts, it is no longer "generally accepted and reported information". http://medicinalgenomics.com
  • HEMP
    Hemp has very little THC which is needed to kill cancer cells! Growing cannabis plants for THC inside a hemp field will not work...where is the fear? From not really knowing about Cannabis and Hemp or just not listening to the people teaching you through testimonies and packets of info over the last few years! Wake up Hoosier law makers!
  • HEMP has many uses
    If our State Government would sue for their rights to grow HEMP like Kentucky did we would not have these issues. AND for your INFORMATION many medical items are also made from HEMP. FOOD, FUEL,FIBER,TEXTILES and MEDICINE are all uses for this plant. South Bend was built on Hemp. Our states antiquated fear of cannabis is embarrassing on the world stage. We really need to lead the way rather than follow. Some day.. we will have freedom in Indiana. And I for one will continue to educate the good folks of this state to the beauty and wonder of this magnificent plant.
    • good new state law-- bad feds
      Put aside all the marijuana concerns, we are talking about food and fiber uses here. The federal impediments to hemp cultivation are totally ridiculous. Preposterous. Biggest hemp cultivators are China and Europe. We get most of ours from Canada. Hemp is as versatile as any crop ever including corn and soy. It's good the governor laid the way for this, regrettable the buffoons in DC stand in the way. A statutory relic of the failed "war on drugs"
      • CANNABIS IS GOOD
        Cannabis is GOOD for our PEOPLE and GOOD for our STATE... 78% would like to see legal access to the product line for better Hoosier Heath. There is a 25% drop in PAIN KILLER Overdoses in states where CANNABIS is legal.

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      1. I have been on this program while on parole from 2011-2013. No person should be forced mentally to share private details of their personal life with total strangers. Also giving permission for a mental therapist to report to your parole agent that your not participating in group therapy because you don't have the financial mean to be in the group therapy. I was personally singled out and sent back three times for not having money and also sent back within the six month when you aren't to be sent according to state law. I will work to het this INSOMM's removed from this state. I also had twelve or thirteen parole agents with a fifteen month period. Thanks for your time.

      2. Our nation produces very few jurists of the caliber of Justice DOUGLAS and his peers these days. Here is that great civil libertarian, who recognized government as both a blessing and, when corrupted by ideological interests, a curse: "Once the investigator has only the conscience of government as a guide, the conscience can become ‘ravenous,’ as Cromwell, bent on destroying Thomas More, said in Bolt, A Man For All Seasons (1960), p. 120. The First Amendment mirrors many episodes where men, harried and harassed by government, sought refuge in their conscience, as these lines of Thomas More show: ‘MORE: And when we stand before God, and you are sent to Paradise for doing according to your conscience, *575 and I am damned for not doing according to mine, will you come with me, for fellowship? ‘CRANMER: So those of us whose names are there are damned, Sir Thomas? ‘MORE: I don't know, Your Grace. I have no window to look into another man's conscience. I condemn no one. ‘CRANMER: Then the matter is capable of question? ‘MORE: Certainly. ‘CRANMER: But that you owe obedience to your King is not capable of question. So weigh a doubt against a certainty—and sign. ‘MORE: Some men think the Earth is round, others think it flat; it is a matter capable of question. But if it is flat, will the King's command make it round? And if it is round, will the King's command flatten it? No, I will not sign.’ Id., pp. 132—133. DOUGLAS THEN WROTE: Where government is the Big Brother,11 privacy gives way to surveillance. **909 But our commitment is otherwise. *576 By the First Amendment we have staked our security on freedom to promote a multiplicity of ideas, to associate at will with kindred spirits, and to defy governmental intrusion into these precincts" Gibson v. Florida Legislative Investigation Comm., 372 U.S. 539, 574-76, 83 S. Ct. 889, 908-09, 9 L. Ed. 2d 929 (1963) Mr. Justice DOUGLAS, concurring. I write: Happy Memorial Day to all -- God please bless our fallen who lived and died to preserve constitutional governance in our wonderful series of Republics. And God open the eyes of those government officials who denounce the constitutions of these Republics by arbitrary actions arising out capricious motives.

      3. From back in the day before secularism got a stranglehold on Hoosier jurists comes this great excerpt via Indiana federal court judge Allan Sharp, dedicated to those many Indiana government attorneys (with whom I have dealt) who count the law as a mere tool, an optional tool that is not to be used when political correctness compels a more acceptable result than merely following the path that the law directs: ALLEN SHARP, District Judge. I. In a scene following a visit by Henry VIII to the home of Sir Thomas More, playwriter Robert Bolt puts the following words into the mouths of his characters: Margaret: Father, that man's bad. MORE: There is no law against that. ROPER: There is! God's law! MORE: Then God can arrest him. ROPER: Sophistication upon sophistication! MORE: No, sheer simplicity. The law, Roper, the law. I know what's legal not what's right. And I'll stick to what's legal. ROPER: Then you set man's law above God's! MORE: No, far below; but let me draw your attention to a fact I'm not God. The currents and eddies of right and wrong, which you find such plain sailing, I can't navigate. I'm no voyager. But in the thickets of law, oh, there I'm a forester. I doubt if there's a man alive who could follow me there, thank God... ALICE: (Exasperated, pointing after Rich) While you talk, he's gone! MORE: And go he should, if he was the Devil himself, until he broke the law! ROPER: So now you'd give the Devil benefit of law! MORE: Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil? ROPER: I'd cut down every law in England to do that! MORE: (Roused and excited) Oh? (Advances on Roper) And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned round on you where would you hide, Roper, the laws being flat? (He leaves *1257 him) This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast man's laws, not God's and if you cut them down and you're just the man to do it d'you really think you would stand upright in the winds that would blow then? (Quietly) Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake. ROPER: I have long suspected this; this is the golden calf; the law's your god. MORE: (Wearily) Oh, Roper, you're a fool, God's my god... (Rather bitterly) But I find him rather too (Very bitterly) subtle... I don't know where he is nor what he wants. ROPER: My God wants service, to the end and unremitting; nothing else! MORE: (Dryly) Are you sure that's God! He sounds like Moloch. But indeed it may be God And whoever hunts for me, Roper, God or Devil, will find me hiding in the thickets of the law! And I'll hide my daughter with me! Not hoist her up the mainmast of your seagoing principles! They put about too nimbly! (Exit More. They all look after him). Pgs. 65-67, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS A Play in Two Acts, Robert Bolt, Random House, New York, 1960. Linley E. Pearson, Atty. Gen. of Indiana, Indianapolis, for defendants. Childs v. Duckworth, 509 F. Supp. 1254, 1256 (N.D. Ind. 1981) aff'd, 705 F.2d 915 (7th Cir. 1983)

      4. "Meanwhile small- and mid-size firms are getting squeezed and likely will not survive unless they become a boutique firm." I've been a business attorney in small, and now mid-size firm for over 30 years, and for over 30 years legal consultants have been preaching this exact same mantra of impending doom for small and mid-sized firms -- verbatim. This claim apparently helps them gin up merger opportunities from smaller firms who become convinced that they need to become larger overnight. The claim that large corporations are interested in cost-saving and efficiency has likewise been preached for decades, and is likewise bunk. If large corporations had any real interest in saving money they wouldn't use large law firms whose rates are substantially higher than those of high-quality mid-sized firms.

      5. The family is the foundation of all human government. That is the Grand Design. Modern governments throw off this Design and make bureaucratic war against the family, as does Hollywood and cultural elitists such as third wave feminists. Since WWII we have been on a ship of fools that way, with both the elite and government and their social engineering hacks relentlessly attacking the very foundation of social order. And their success? See it in the streets of Fergusson, on the food stamp doles (mostly broken families)and in the above article. Reject the Grand Design for true social function, enter the Glorious State to manage social dysfunction. Our Brave New World will be a prison camp, and we will welcome it as the only way to manage given the anarchy without it.

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