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Hickey: Food For Thought

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IBA-Hickey-ChristineSeveral weeks ago, I attended a press conference called by Attorney General Greg Zoeller. The news to be released: that attorneys are once again doing good. In fact, attorneys across the state banded together to contribute fifty tons of food for regional food banks. Indianapolis boasted the top firms with the largest contributions in each of three categories: large firms, small firms, and law offices of public or nonprofit lawyers. Not surprisingly, the attorney leading the charge for the large firm winner is a graduate of the IBA Bar Leader Series.

Fast forward to one week later: I attended the graduation of the IBA Bar Leader Series VI. Attorneys selected for the Bar Leader program are expected to develop and execute a community service team project, details of which are shared during the final day culminating in graduation from the program. Enter 25 lawyers, add the Bar Leader Series, and a grant from the Indianapolis Bar Foundation, and it’s pretty powerful. As I sat during presentations made by the groups of five, I was awestruck by the generosity of time and talent that these attorneys contributed to our community. It was during the presentation of these projects that I realized how important it was to share them with our members. These are their stories.

Abandoned Housing. For the homeowner, tackling a problem involving abandoned housing isn’t easy. In fact, when five lawyers got together to decide how best to help in this area, they discovered that first-hand. They set about to gather resources, find answers, and to create a resource guide to empower communities to use tools available to them to help combat the problem. The resource guide is a comprehensive tool for the public that provides in one place answers to problems presented by abandoned housing.

B.L.I.N.G. A second group chose to focus on mentoring young students by teaming up with B.L.I.N.G: Business Leadership in the Next Generation In doing so, the attorneys put together an orientation kick off program aimed at encouraging greater parent and student participation. In addition, two students in this summer program will be sponsored by this group of Bar Leaders.

Peace Coaches Program. These five lawyers underwent training through the Peace Learning Center and then took what they learned back to the Shortridge Magnet School in a firstof-its-kind Peace Coaches Program. Through the program, the attorneys taught children about managing emotions, listening skills, what makes an acceptable apology, and a host of other topics aimed at peaceful conflict resolution.

FUTSOUL. Concerned about combating gang-related activities in a suburb of Indianapolis, this group channeled their energies into creating something lasting for a multicultural community starving for a positive outlet for children. From securing a site to creating a logo, a youth sporting league was created. The attorneys not only organized, structured, and planned a long-term vision for the FUTSOUL league, but they learned this soccer-like sport themselves and even coach on the weekends!

Tumble for Troops. The final program created during this Bar Leader Series focused on the temporarily-fractured military family. Understanding that spouses and children grappling with a missing spouse or parent can feel isolated, this group hosted an event in April to bring these families together for a stress-free evening of fun and support. The event also served to announce the creation of a website to connect these military families to loved ones on active duty and to each other.

As diverse as they were creative, the projects selected by the attorneys were not in areas where their skill and training prepared them for practice. The projects chosen were as powerful as the message they delivered: that even in unfamiliar territory, attorneys are leaders who have the ability to make a difference when they set their mind to it. Whether through an organized forum or on your own, from helping to combat depletion of food for the needy to creating a positive outlet for impressionable youth, these types of community projects impact not only a community, but also the attorneys who participate in them. Now that is food for thought.

The IBA Bar Leader Series helps prepare attorneys to assume leadership roles in their profession and the community. The application process for the next series is now open and I encourage lawyers in their third through tenth year of practice to submit an application (available at www.indybar.org) by the deadline of June 21, 2010.•

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  1. The ADA acts as a tax upon all for the benefit of a few. And, most importantly, the many have no individual say in whether they pay the tax. Those with handicaps suffered in military service should get a pass, but those who are handicapped by accident or birth do NOT deserve that pass. The drivel about "equal access" is spurious because the handicapped HAVE equal access, they just can't effectively use it. That is their problem, not society's. The burden to remediate should be that of those who seek the benefit of some social, constructional, or dimensional change, NOT society generally. Everybody wants to socialize the costs and concentrate the benefits of government intrusion so that they benefit and largely avoid the costs. This simply maintains the constant push to the slop trough, and explains, in part, why the nation is 20 trillion dollars in the hole.

  2. Hey 2 psychs is never enough, since it is statistically unlikely that three will ever agree on anything! New study admits this pseudo science is about as scientifically valid as astrology ... done by via fortune cookie ....John Ioannidis, professor of health research and policy at Stanford University, said the study was impressive and that its results had been eagerly awaited by the scientific community. “Sadly, the picture it paints - a 64% failure rate even among papers published in the best journals in the field - is not very nice about the current status of psychological science in general, and for fields like social psychology it is just devastating,” he said. http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/aug/27/study-delivers-bleak-verdict-on-validity-of-psychology-experiment-results

  3. Indianapolis Bar Association President John Trimble and I are on the same page, but it is a very large page with plenty of room for others to join us. As my final Res Gestae article will express in more detail in a few days, the Great Recession hastened a fundamental and permanent sea change for the global legal service profession. Every state bar is facing the same existential questions that thrust the medical profession into national healthcare reform debates. The bench, bar, and law schools must comprehensively reconsider how we define the practice of law and what it means to access justice. If the three principals of the legal service profession do not recast the vision of their roles and responsibilities soon, the marketplace will dictate those roles and responsibilities without regard for the public interests that the legal profession professes to serve.

  4. I have met some highly placed bureaucrats who vehemently disagree, Mr. Smith. This is not your father's time in America. Some ideas are just too politically incorrect too allow spoken, says those who watch over us for the good of their concept of order.

  5. Lets talk about this without forgetting that Lawyers, too, have FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND ASSOCIATION

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