Hickey: State of the Bar Association

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IBA-Hickey-ChristineIt is hard to believe, but the year is officially half over. Reflecting on the first six months, it has been a very productive, very good time for the Bar. The State of the Bar is indeed very good.

Membership. In June, volunteer Bar leaders personally called lapsed or prospective IBA members during the first-ever “membership week”. At a time when other volunteer organizations have suffered unusually high rates of attrition, the IBA boasts a membership stronger than ever. Current membership stands at 4,585.

E-Filing Task Force. The Marion County Circuit and Superior Court Electronic Filing Pilot Project is underway and members are using the system. According to recent figures, approximately 20% of filings are currently electronic. The Task Force is soliciting comments via email to All input is encouraged. The Task Force will meet with the Marion County judges this fall to share feedback on the project.

Legal Services Advisory Committee. Lawyer Referral Service is on the verge of launching a new online referral management system thanks to the hard work of the LSAC Committee and IBA staff. Panel members will find the web-based referral and reporting system both efficient and user-friendly. Referrals to panel members this year total 10,454.

Website. The current IBA website will be a thing of the past in months to come. The IBA has contracted with a website design and development firm and is working diligently on the creation of a new website that is as amazing functionally as it is visually appealing. The projected launch date is late fall.

Solo-Small Firm. This Section is planning a “Boot Camp” aimed at practical tips for sole practitioners and small-firm attorneys on everything from vendor relations to the day-to-day running of a law practice, with a focus on younger lawyers. Being held in conjunction with the Professionalism Committee Surviving and Thriving Program, save the date on October 8, 2010 for a not-to-be-missed event.

Bar Leader. In May, the Bar graduated 25 attorneys from the seventh class of its kind, unveiling an impressive array of community projects. Applications have been accepted for the next class which will begin in September and the Bar Leader Steering Committee is already in the planning stages for another successful program.

Bench Bar. In June, the Bar had a record number of first-time attendees at the Bench Bar Conference in Louisville. A first-ever special reception to welcome these attendees was hosted by the Membership Committee. Overall, registration for the conference exceeded 300, there was exceptional CLE programming, and the networking opportunities were plentiful. The conference was a success in all respects and volunteers are already in the planning stages for Bench Bar 2011.

Meetings of Members. Our members have come out to these monthly events, from luncheons to evening cocktail hours. As a Bar, we have met with lawyer-legislators, celebrated paralegals, had cocktails with opposing counsel, and there are many more to come.

Professionalism. This committee has created a resume bank for displaced/unemployed lawyers. Resumes for those who are interested can be emailed to

Programs. The IBA has presented 91 programs so far this year, including social events and continuing legal education. The remainder of the year has a calendar packed with additional program offerings.

Bar Review. The Summer 2010 session of IndyBar Review was sold out and has just concluded.

Destination CLE. The Bar is taking the show on the road to Las Vegas. On November 18-19th, save the date to travel with friends and colleagues for an impressive line-up of programs, speakers, and fun while getting CLE on a trip to the strip. Be on the look-out for details in coming issues of the Indiana Lawyer and the IBA EBulletin.

Leadership. An organization is only as good as those who belong and those who lead. IBA Board members are working hard on your behalf. Board meetings are monthly, and each member has taken on a project or initiative for the IBA. Section, Division, and Committee Chairs and volunteers likewise are responsible for all of the great things happening at the Bar. IBA Staff has guided every project and daily continues to insure that the State of the Bar is and continues to be not just good, but better than ever. And that is the State of the Bar.•


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  1. I think the cops are doing a great job locking up criminals. The Murder rates in the inner cities are skyrocketing and you think that too any people are being incarcerated. Maybe we need to lock up more of them. We have the ACLU, BLM, NAACP, Civil right Division of the DOJ, the innocent Project etc. We have court system with an appeal process that can go on for years, with attorneys supplied by the government. I'm confused as to how that translates into the idea that the defendants are not being represented properly. Maybe the attorneys need to do more Pro-Bono work

  2. We do not have 10% of our population (which would mean about 32 million) incarcerated. It's closer to 2%.

  3. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  4. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  5. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.