Hickey: Sweet Tweet

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IBA-Hickey-ChristineTechnology and social media, it’s all the buzz in Bar circles. In fact, having just returned from the Conference of Metropolitan Bar Associations, I can report that connecting members better and more efficiently was one of the top priorities for associations across the country. During the sessions, however, it quickly became apparent that not everyone is comfortable with social media and some lawyers have never visited Facebook or understood what a “tweet” is. (Thankfully, Facebook addicts were not at our conference and we were not any of the reported thousands who were depressed by the recent crash of the social network giant.)

Social media to some means lunch at the Barnes & Noble café with friends. In reality, it captures the wave of instant access that has taken hold of society. From smart phones, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and You Tube, it’s enough to make your head spin. On the plane back from the conference, I read about “share rooms” on virtual platforms between lawyers and clients. Believe it or not, there is a Facebook page about Twitter. The data released on social media is astounding, and it solidifies the need to become acquainted with these tools that are making virtual relationships a reality.

According to a recently-released ABA survey on technology, remote access to law offices jumped 10% from 2009 to 2010, for an estimated 73% of respondents using remote access software. Lawyers are making use of virtual offices and 43% of survey respondents maintain some form of a social network presence. Attorneys also attributed new business to connections made through social networking.

Are you one of the technologically savvy who participates in real-time micro-blogging or are you one of those who is still clinging to pink message pads and dictaphones? Although I am anything but an expert on social media, I thought it fitting to briefly explore some of the more popular tools for staying connected.

Twitter: Twitter is a website which allows busy people to stay connected through short messages called “tweets.” Tweets are text-based posts limited to 140 characters described as “short bursts of inconsequential information.” (There is a list on Techcrunch for 15 alternative things to do when Twitter is down; going outside made it to the bottom of that list.)

You Tube: A video-sharing website, You Tube is no longer just for music or pet-trick videos. There are over 600 bar association videos posted to this site, and over 120,000 that involve lawyers in some way. Videos span everything from how to become a lawyer to the infamous videotape of how not to conduct a deposition in Texas.

Facebook: Is a social media website that allows users to add friends, create profiles, join networks, and communicate either through private, public or chat features. Facebook is the most used social network worldwide and it is estimated that one of every 14 people is an active user.

LinkedIn: Is dubbed as the network connecting professionals. By establishing a profile and “linking” with friends and colleagues, you can stay connected to the estimated 75 million other professionals on this site.

A Google search will quickly introduce you to these forms of social media. The Bar is also providing important information on technology in its full-day Surviving & Thriving Program on Friday, October 8, 2010. Sessions geared toward solo/small-firm practice include effective practice management through the use of technology, protecting digital information, e-filing tips for Marion County cases and essential technology trends for building and streamlining your practice (Register online at

The IndyBar strives to stay relevant and connected to its members and we are excited to release our new website in the coming weeks. As we unveil the fabulously new-and-improved, more user-friendly site, we will continue to explore other ways in which we can keep you connected to the legal community. Not to worry, however, we still recognize the importance of face-to-face gatherings, and we will continue to provide invaluable networking opportunities to our members. After all, a real lunch is far better than any virtual chicken or sweet tweet you could ever get online.•


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  1. I think the cops are doing a great job locking up criminals. The Murder rates in the inner cities are skyrocketing and you think that too any people are being incarcerated. Maybe we need to lock up more of them. We have the ACLU, BLM, NAACP, Civil right Division of the DOJ, the innocent Project etc. We have court system with an appeal process that can go on for years, with attorneys supplied by the government. I'm confused as to how that translates into the idea that the defendants are not being represented properly. Maybe the attorneys need to do more Pro-Bono work

  2. We do not have 10% of our population (which would mean about 32 million) incarcerated. It's closer to 2%.

  3. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  4. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  5. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.