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Hickey: Things You Can Count On

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IBA-Hickey-ChristineThis is not about death and taxes. Rather, this is an exciting time of year and as I sat down to write this article, it became clear to me how important it is to have things to look forward to, things you can count on. No matter how small, no matter how seemingly inconsequential, tradition is an important part of our lives.

For years, on the Monday after Thanksgiving at the office we would come back to fresh holiday greenery and an overwhelming smell of pine. Wreaths and garland filled the foyer, the stairwells, the air. It marked the official start of December and the end of another year. For so long it was expected, and after a while more attention was paid to the needles that fell on the floor than the spirit the garland brought to our space.

A few years back, the greenery stopped; the florist who came to hang it was needed no more. The Monday after Thanksgiving came and went with no greenery; it was just another day. We all went about our business.

Just this past week, the first snow of the season fell on downtown trees all aglow with holiday lights. Salvation Army bell ringers have taken their place on street corners, beckoning to passers by to fill their red buckets. Law firm cards, well wishes, and open houses have begun. Thoughts of New Year’s resolutions are pushed aside, to be considered only after the holiday feasts have come and gone. Sweaters worn only at this time are pulled off of shelves, and every possible new toy imaginable is giving Super Bowl commercials a run for their money. These are the things that come with December.

The Bar also has things you can count on at this time of year. You can count on the Bar to cover your CLE needs. Each year the IndyBar offers an 11th Hour Video Replay series that is convenient, perfect for last-minute planners, and the most affordable CLE around. The dates this year are December 28, 29, and 30. The full schedule of videos can be found at www.indybar.org on the Events calendar. No advance registration is needed, the cost is $30 per hour for members, and brown-bag lunches are welcome.

It also wouldn’t be that time of year if we didn’t ask you for a contribution to the Indianapolis Bar Foundation. So much of what the Bar does is made possible through support of the IBF. The Foundation provides funds to support local law-related initiatives and organizations, law students, lawyers, and many important Bar programs. Funding for books for naturalization ceremonies, underwriting of pro bono programs like Ask a Lawyer, and scholarships to replenish the profession all come from the Foundation. Without members of the legal profession who are committed to giving back, much of this would not be possible. So that we can continue to have an impact in our community and on our profession, please make your donation to the Foundation today by check or online through the Foundation link located on the IndyBar website.

Lastly, but certainly not least, get out that holiday sweater and take the time to spend a couple of hours with your friends. Regardless of what the year has brought, and never mind busy schedules, the annual IndyBar holiday party is an event not to miss. This gathering brings together our community of attorneys, some of whose paths may only cross at this event. It’s a great time to catch up with colleagues, give well wishes, and share a toast with a friend. This year, the Bar is hosting the party on the 15th floor at 135 North Pennsylvania, on December 14 from 5:00 to 7:00. It’s free to all members and you will find the same smiling faces and holiday spirit as you have in years past.

For me, although I do miss the holiday greenery, I always look forward to celebrating another year with friends at the IndyBar holiday party. It’s a part of my December tradition. Lots of great lawyers, great people, and a great time. That is something you can count on.•

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  1. KUDOS to the Indiana Supreme Court for realizing that some bureacracies need to go to the stake. Recall what RWR said: "No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" NOW ... what next to this rare and inspiring chopping block? Well, the Commission on Gender and Race (but not religion!?!) is way overdue. And some other Board's could be cut with a positive for State and the reputation of the Indiana judiciary.

  2. During a visit where an informant with police wears audio and video, does the video necessary have to show hand to hand transaction of money and narcotics?

  3. I will agree with that as soon as law schools stop lying to prospective students about salaries and employment opportunities in the legal profession. There is no defense to the fraudulent numbers first year salaries they post to mislead people into going to law school.

  4. The sad thing is that no fish were thrown overboard The "greenhorn" who had never fished before those 5 days was interrogated for over 4 hours by 5 officers until his statement was illicited, "I don't want to go to prison....." The truth is that these fish were measured frozen off shore and thawed on shore. The FWC (state) officer did not know fish shrink, so the only reason that these fish could be bigger was a swap. There is no difference between a 19 1/2 fish or 19 3/4 fish, short fish is short fish, the ticket was written. In addition the FWC officer testified at trial, he does not measure fish in accordance with federal law. There was a document prepared by the FWC expert that said yes, fish shrink and if these had been measured correctly they averaged over 20 inches (offshore frozen). This was a smoke and mirror prosecution.

  5. I love this, Dave! Many congrats to you! We've come a long way from studying for the bar together! :)

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