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Hickey:The Many Faces of IndyBar

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IBA-Hickey-ChristineEarlier this year, I promised that we would introduce you to the many faces of the Indianapolis Bar Association. Over the course of the year, we have written about many IBA members who have had an impact on our profession and in our legal community. We have shared with you award recipients and volunteers who have made us proud to call them our friends and fellow IBA members. We have given you people from the past and present who have paved the way for us as lawyers and as an Association. What we have not done, however, is pay tribute to the people who have worked hard this year to represent the Association as a member of the 2010 Board of Directors.

Officers

President-Elect: Mike J. Hebenstreit, Witham, Hebenstreit & Zubek LLP

First Vice President: A. Scott Chinn, Baker & Daniels LLP

Secretary: The Honorable Robyn L. Moberly, Marion Superior Court

Treasurer: Jeffrey A. Abrams, Benesch/Dann Pecar

Immediate Past President: James H. Voyles, Jr., Voyles Zahn Paul Hogan & Merriman

Vice Presidents

The Honorable Heather A. Welch, Marion Superior Court

James J. Bell, Bingham McHale LLP

William W. Gooden, Clark, Quinn, Moses, Scott & Grahn, LLP

D. Rusty Denton, Bingham McHale LLP

Directors

Kristin Arthur, Law Student Division Representative

Christopher E. Baker, Hostetler & Kowalik, PC

Ben T. Caughey, Ice Miller LLP

Elisabeth M. Edwards, Jocham Hardin Demick Jackson, PC

Kelly R. Eskew, Clarian Health Partners Inc.

Ryan K. Gardner, Ryan Gardner, P.C.

Rebecca W. Geyer, Hollingsworth & Zivitz, PC

Rori L. Goldman, Hill, Fulwider, McDowell, Funk & Matthews, PC

John F. Kautzman, Ruckelshaus Kautzman Blackwell Bemis & Hasbrook

Elizabeth H. Knotts, Hill, Fulwider, McDowell, Funk & Matthews, PC

John R. Maley, Indianapolis Bar Foundation President, Barnes & Thornburg LLP

Kevin P. McGoff, Bingham McHale, LLP

Jimmie L. Mcmillian, Barnes & Thornburg LLP

The Honorable Anthony Metz, III, United States Bankruptcy Court

Andi M. Metzel, Benesch/Dann Pecar

John C. Render, Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman PC

Jason Reyome, A. Demos & J. Reyome, Attorneys & Counselors at Law

Gary R. Roberts, Dean, Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis

Andrew Z. Soshnick, Baker & Daniels LLP

Counsel to the Board

Robert T. Grand, Barnes & Thornburg LLP

Mark R. Owens, Barnes & Thornburg LLP

Each of these people has devoted a significant amount of time, talent, and energy to this Association throughout the year. They have taken on projects, organized events, and served as ambassadors for our Association both within and outside of our city. They have treated their board service as a priority, and put the interests of our members first. Thank you to the 2010 IBA Board of Directors for your hard work and dedication throughout this year on behalf of the Indianapolis Bar Association!

2010 IBA Board of Directors
 

iba

Not pictured: Scott Chinn, Jeff Abrams, Rusty Denton, Ryan Gardner, Beth Knotts, John Maley, Kevin McGoff, Hon. Anthony Metz, John Render, Mark Owens, Jim Voyles

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  1. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  2. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  3. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  4. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  5. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

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