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IBA: Court Seeks Commissioner Applicants

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Marion Superior Court is accepting resumes for full-time Commissioners. These positions may be assigned either to a rotation within the Marion Superior Court system (Criminal and/or Civil Division) or to the Arrestee Processing Center (A.P.C.).

If this position is assigned to the A.P.C., the work schedule for this position will be based on the facility’s operating hours of 24 hours per day, 7 days per work with holiday schedules. This position will be scheduled to work 10 hour shifts during their work week (7am-5pm, 7pm-5am), which will include weekend shifts and covering night shifts for 3 months per year. Applicants need to be aware that the work schedule will require days, evening/nights, and weekend work if assigned to the A.P.C.

For an A.P.C. assignment, job duties will include conducting initial hearings for misdemeanor and D Felony offenders, probable cause reviews and making bond/bail decisions.

If assigned to a rotation within Marion Superior Court, Criminal Division, job duties will include: conducting initial hearings; reviewing and ruling on motions; presiding at hearings and bench trials; conducting hearings and trials related to misdemeanors, D-felonies, Major Felonies and/or Domestic Violence cases; reviewing warrants and motions; and presiding over jury trials. If assigned to a rotation within Marion Superior Court, Civil Division, job duties will include: reviewing and ruling on motions; presiding at hearings and bench trials; presiding at hearings related to domestic relations and protective orders; and presiding over jury trials.

Applicants must be admitted to practice law in the State of Indiana with five years of practice and be in good standing with the Indiana Supreme Court. Marion County residency is required.

All applicants must submit a resume via email to the Director of Human Resources for Marion Superior Court at: pbova@indy.gov during the application window, which is July 1 – July 31, 2010.•

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