ILNews

IBA Frontlines - 11/9/12

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Carr Appointed to U.S. Bankruptcy Court Bench

IndyBar member Jim Carr has been appointed to a 14-year term as U.S. Bankruptcy Judge in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana. His appointment, made by Chief Judge Frank H. Easterbrook of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, will become effective on January 1, 2013. Carr will join fellow IndyBar member and recent addition to the court Judge Robyn Moberly, who joined the bench on November 1 following the retirement of Judge Tony Metz.

Volunteers Needed for Naturalization Ceremonies

Courtroom connotations: stress, contention and opposition. Let the IndyBar change that for you—participate in a warm, wonderful Naturalization Ceremony. Twice a month, the IndyBar sends representatives to the Naturalization Ceremonies to give welcoming words to the new citizens. Ceremonies are held in the Federal Courthouse, last about an hour and are held on Thursday mornings. For more information and to volunteer, contact Caren Chopp at cchopp@indybar.org.

Training Sessions Offered for Pro Bono Volunteers

The Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic, in partnership with the Indianapolis Bar Association, Barnes & Thornburg LLP and Ice Miller LLP, is offering two upcoming continuing legal education classes. All sessions are offered for free to those who agree to accept a pro bono case referral from the clinic. “Immigration Law: Understanding the Legal Needs of Vulnerable Populations” will be held on Friday, November 30 from 8:20 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ice Miller LLP. “Understanding Family Law: Domestic Violence Victims & the Poverty Population” will be held on Monday, December 10 from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Barnes & Thornburg LLP. Visit www.nclegalclinic.org for more information and registration.

I’m a New Lawyer ...Now What?

Calling all new admittees! Don’t miss the IndyBar’s upcoming New Admittee Roundtable and Reception on November 14 from 4 to 7 p.m. This program, offered at no-cost for all 2012 new admittees to the Indiana Bar, will shed light on the things new lawyers need to know that WEREN’T taught in law school. From CLE credits to tips on that first court appearance, attendees will come away with knowledge that will help to build confidence and promote success as a new lawyer. The roundtable portion of the program, which will run from 4 to 5 p.m., will be followed by an informal cocktail reception to allow for networking and mingling with fellow new admittees and presenters. Access additional information and online registration at www.indybar.org.

Ask a Lawyer Assists a Record 578 Hoosiers

The final numbers are in, and the IndyBar’s Fall 2012 Ask a Lawyer program on Tuesday, October 9 succeeded in assisting 578 Hoosiers, a record for the program. Ninety-nine IndyBar attorneys and paralegals participated in this free legal advice program that enables area residents to speak face-to-face with attorneys at no cost. Volunteers were stationed throughout the city at Indianapolis Marion County Public Library branches, with additional attorneys manning phone lines at the IndyBar office. Thank you to the many volunteers, the Pro Bono Standing Committee, the support of Indianapolis Marion County Public Libraries and a generous grant from the Indianapolis Bar Foundation for making this valuable program a possibility.

The IndyBar Legal Directory is Here!

Pre-ordered legal directories are available for pickup at the IndyBar office during normal business hours (Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.). Forget to order your copy? Go to www.indybar.org/store to place your order today. Directories are $55 plus tax and shipping, if applicable.•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. The sad thing is that no fish were thrown overboard The "greenhorn" who had never fished before those 5 days was interrogated for over 4 hours by 5 officers until his statement was illicited, "I don't want to go to prison....." The truth is that these fish were measured frozen off shore and thawed on shore. The FWC (state) officer did not know fish shrink, so the only reason that these fish could be bigger was a swap. There is no difference between a 19 1/2 fish or 19 3/4 fish, short fish is short fish, the ticket was written. In addition the FWC officer testified at trial, he does not measure fish in accordance with federal law. There was a document prepared by the FWC expert that said yes, fish shrink and if these had been measured correctly they averaged over 20 inches (offshore frozen). This was a smoke and mirror prosecution.

  2. I love this, Dave! Many congrats to you! We've come a long way from studying for the bar together! :)

  3. This outbreak illustrates the absurdity of the extreme positions taken by today's liberalism, specifically individualism and the modern cult of endless personal "freedom." Ebola reminds us that at some point the person's own "freedom" to do this and that comes into contact with the needs of the common good and "freedom" must be curtailed. This is not rocket science, except, today there is nonstop propaganda elevating individual preferences over the common good, so some pundits have a hard time fathoming the obvious necessity of quarantine in some situations....or even NATIONAL BORDERS...propagandists have also amazingly used this as another chance to accuse Western nations of "racism" which is preposterous and offensive. So one the one hand the idolatry of individualism has to stop and on the other hand facts people don't like that intersect with race-- remain facts nonetheless. People who respond to facts over propaganda do better in the long run. We call it Truth. Sometimes it seems hard to find.

  4. It would be hard not to feel the Kramers' anguish. But Catholic Charities, by definition, performed due diligence and held to the statutory standard of care. No good can come from punishing them for doing their duty. Should Indiana wish to change its laws regarding adoption agreements and or putative fathers, the place for that is the legislature and can only apply to future cases. We do not apply new laws to past actions, as the Kramers seem intent on doing, to no helpful end.

  5. I am saddened to hear about the loss of Zeff Weiss. He was an outstanding member of the Indianapolis legal community. My thoughts are with his family.

ADVERTISEMENT