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IBA Frontlines 4/27/12

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McCrory Named Chair of Women United by United Way of Central Indiana

Frost Brown Todd’s Patricia Polis McCrory has been named Chair of Women United by United Way of Central Indiana (UWCI) for 2012-2014. By virtue of that role, McCrory will also serve on United Way’s board of directors and on United Way’s Resource Development Committee. Ms. McCrory is a member in Frost Brown Todd’s business litigation practice group. She concentrates her practice in business, complex litigation and environmental matters.

ABA Announces No Changes to be Proposed to Policy Prohibiting Nonlawyer Ownership

The ABA Commission on Ethics 20/20 decided at its April meeting that it will not propose changes to the current ABA policy that prohibits non-lawyer ownership of law firms. Regarding the decision, Commission co-chairs Jamie S. Gorelick and Michael Traynor said, “Since its creation in 2009, the commission has undertaken a careful study of alternative law practice structures. Based on the commission’s extensive outreach, research, consultation, and the response of the profession, there does not appear to be a sufficient basis for recommending a change to ABA policy on non-lawyer ownership of law firms.”

Applications Available for Judicial Position on the Court of Appeals of Indiana

A position on the Court of Appeals of Indiana will be available when Judge Carr Darden retires this summer. Judge Darden was named to the Court of Appeals by Governor Evan Bayh in 1994. His retirement creates an opening on the fifteen-member court. The application and application instructions for the position are available online at http://www.in.gov/judiciary/jud-qual/2946.htm. Applications are due May 9, 2012. The Commission will conduct initial public interviews of qualified candidates in Indianapolis on May 15-17, 2012, followed by second interviews on June 4-5, 2012.

Celebration Dinner for Justice Shepard Planned

On May 10, the Indiana State Bar Association, in conjunction with the Indiana Supreme Court, will be holding a celebration dinner at the JW Marriott in honor of former Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard. A reception will be held at 6 p.m. with dinner to begin at 7 p.m. Individual tickets for the event are available for $75, and tables of ten can be purchased for $800. In addition, the planning committee is collecting tributes to be included in the event program. For information on submitting a tribute as well as registration information, visit the Indiana State Bar Association website at www.inbar.org.

Deadline Approaching—Have You Ordered Your Legal Directory?

The IndyBar will release a new edition of the print directory in Summer 2012. This directory includes more than 6,000 legal professionals—both members and non-members—in the Indy area, as well as useful contact information for courts and agencies. The directory is available for pre-order at www.indybar.org/store/. All orders must be placed by Friday, April 27.

 Help us compile the most accurate directory possible—make sure to check your contact information and submit a photo to be included with your listing. See www.indybar.org for full details on the directory, including instructions for updating your member information. Interested in advertising in the directory? Contact Tara Moore at tmoore@indybar.org for further information. Don’t forget—the full directory is always available online by logging in at www.indybar.org.•

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  1. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  2. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  3. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  4. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  5. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

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