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Mexico in Transition

As Mexico transitions to a legal system similar to the model utilized in the United States, members of the Indianapolis legal community are invited to an educational program on the future of the judicial and criminal justice system featuring U.S. Senator Richard Lugar and Indiana Attorney General Gregory Zoeller set for September 26 from 3-5 p.m. at Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis. A reception will follow. Please RSVP to oageducation@atg.in.gov.

Solo and Small Firm Practitioners: This Program is for You!

Through the upcoming Surviving and Thriving program on Friday, October 8, the IndyBar’s Solo/Small Firm Section and Professionalism Committee are proud to provide solo and small firm practitioners–whether newly graduated, seasoned pros or those transitioning to the solo/small firm world–with the tools, information and connections to not only survive, but thrive in the practice of law. In just one day you’ll get practical advice, answers to questions and important tips on how to build a successful business. Relevant programming combined with respected local speakers make Surviving and Thriving an essential and cost effective program for all solo and small firm practitioners. 6.0 hours of CLE credit are available in the full day program. More details and online registration is available online at www.indybar.org.

Book Your Vegas Trip Today!

Don’t miss out on the IndyBar’s upcoming Vegas CLE Getaway, which will take place November 18-20 at the Mandalay Bay. More details and online registration is available online at www.indybar.org.

Get the Straight Talk!

Wish you could hear insider tips and tricks from judges and county agencies? Want to find out exactly what judges expect from attorneys in their courtrooms? Then you don’t want to miss “Straight Talk from the City-County Building,” a day-long program on September 24 designed to give Indianapolis attorneys the insider information that will empower them to be more successful practitioners. This program is offered exclusively by the IndyBar, and attendance is limited– More details and online registration is available online at www.indybar.org.•

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  1. Paul Ogden doing a fine job of remembering his peer Gary Welsh with the post below and a call for an Indy gettogether to celebrate Gary .... http://www.ogdenonpolitics.com/2016/05/indiana-loses-citizen-journalist-giant.html Castaways of Indiana, unite!

  2. It's unfortunate that someone has attempted to hijack the comments to promote his own business. This is not an article discussing the means of preserving the record; no matter how it's accomplished, ethics and impartiality are paramount concerns. When a party to litigation contracts directly with a reporting firm, it creates, at the very least, the appearance of a conflict of interest. Court reporters, attorneys and judges are officers of the court and must abide by court rules as well as state and federal laws. Parties to litigation have no such ethical responsibilities. Would we accept insurance companies contracting with judges? This practice effectively shifts costs to the party who can least afford it while reducing costs for the party with the most resources. The success of our justice system depends on equal access for all, not just for those who have the deepest pockets.

  3. As a licensed court reporter in California, I have to say that I'm sure that at some point we will be replaced by speech recognition. However, from what I've seen of it so far, it's a lot farther away than three years. It doesn't sound like Mr. Hubbard has ever sat in a courtroom or a deposition room where testimony is being given. Not all procedures are the same, and often they become quite heated with the ends of question and beginning of answers overlapping. The human mind can discern the words to a certain extent in those cases, but I doubt very much that a computer can yet. There is also the issue of very heavy accents and mumbling. People speak very fast nowadays, and in order to do that, they generally slur everything together, they drop or swallow words like "the" and "and." Voice recognition might be able to produce some form of a transcript, but I'd be very surprised if it produces an accurate or verbatim transcript, as is required in the legal world.

  4. Really enjoyed the profile. Congratulations to Craig on living the dream, and kudos to the pros who got involved to help him realize the vision.

  5. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

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