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IBA: IBF - Your Local Bar's Charitable Arm

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By John R. Maley

The Indianapolis Bar Foundation has a distinct history and mission, making positive impact in the Indianapolis community through the philanthropy of thousands of IBA members. The IBF is the charitable arm of the IBA, providing critical financial support for key programs.

What We Do?

The IBF was created in 1968 by a group of distinguished IBA leaders to provide a means for Indianapolis lawyers to serve unmet legal needs in the community. Since its founding, the IBF has helped serve thousands in need.

First, the IBF supports local pro bono. The IBF does this through funding the IBA pro bono coordinator position and programs. You, the local IBA member, provide the volunteer pro bono services, but without the IBF’s funding of programs, the impact and reach of local pro bono would be diminished.

For instance, the IBF funds the successful Legal Lines program, which provides a regular avenue to get prompt, insightful guidance to everyday legal issues. The IBF similarly funds the IBA’s Ask A Lawyer pro bono programs, reaching diverse populations in the community with growing legal needs.

The IBF also replenishes the profession by providing scholarships to deserving law students, IndyBar Review students, and IBA Bar Leader attendees.

Finally, the IBF provides critical funding for impact programs, such as the Child’s Haven waiting room in the City-County Building, providing a welcoming place for children while parents attend court proceedings.

Where Do The Funds Come From?

Virtually all IBF funding comes from the generosity of IBA members, through dues checkoff, private gifts, Fellows and Senior Fellows, and support for the IBF’s fundraisers.

How Can You Still Help This Year?

As year-end approaches and you consider charitable giving, consider the IBF and help us serve others. The needs are great – your gift will make an impact. Thank you.•

___________

Maley is the President of the Indianapolis Bar Foundation and a partner at Barnes & Thornburg, LLP.

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