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IBA: IndyBar Member Selected as New U.S. Magistrate Judge

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The United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana recently announced the selection of Mark J. Dinsmore as the new United States Magistrate Judge. The position filled by Dinsmore was vacated by the elevation of the Hon. Jane Magnus Stinson.

Dinsmore, a member of the Indianapolis Bar Association, is currently a partner at the law firm of Barnes & Thornburg LLP, where he has practiced since 1996. His practice concentrates in the areas of complex commercial disputes and construction litigation matters, as well as media law issues.
 

Dinsmore-mark-mug Dinsmore

A Magistrate Judge Merit Selection Committee chaired by retired Magistrate Judge V. Sue Shields reviewed more than 50 applications and recommended five candidates for the position. The District Judges of the court interviewed the five candidates and ultimately selected Dinsmore.

Regarding the selection, Chief Judge Richard L. Young commented, “The Merit Selection Panel forwarded to the court an array of very outstanding candidates, and it was a difficult decision for the court to select only one of them. We do believe that Mark Dinsmore has the credentials, background, and experience to make an outstanding Magistrate Judge.“

Born in Valparaiso, Indiana, and a magna cum laude graduate of the University of Toledo College of Law, Dinsmore graduated first in his class, served as lead articles editor of the University of Toledo Law Review, and was named the Outstanding Law Graduate. He received his A.B. in economics from Wabash College in 1983. Mr. Dinsmore has litigated throughout the United States, focusing on management of complex cases, with concentrations in construction litigation and electronic discovery. He has also represented clients in international and domestic arbitrations, including representing the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina in an international arbitration arising out of the Dayton Accords that ended the Balkan war. He serves as treasurer of the board of directors of Indiana Legal Services, Inc., and is a member of the board of directors of the Heartland Pro Bono Council. Mr. Dinsmore is admitted to practice in the state of Indiana, the United States District Courts for the Northern and Southern Districts of Indiana, and the United States Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit.

During his practice he has focused on the use of technology to facilitate the management of complex matters and chairs the firm’s Litigation Department Technology Committee. Prior to joining Barnes & Thornburg, Dinsmore served as a law clerk for the Honorable John Daniel Tinder, then judge of the United States Court District Court for the Southern District of Indiana and now judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Before attending law school, Dinsmore served as a captain in the United States Army in, among other places, the Republic of Korea. During his service he was twice named Eighth Army Outstanding Junior Leader.

United States Magistrate Judges are appointed by the Judges of the U.S. District Court for a term of eight years, and are eligible for reappointment to successive terms. Mr. Dinsmore’s appointment will be effective upon completion of required IRS and FBI background investigations.•

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  1. Oh, the name calling was not name calling, it was merely social commentary making this point, which is on the minds of many, as an aside to the article's focus: https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100111082327AAmlmMa Or, if you prefer a local angle, I give you exhibit A in that analysis of viva la difference: http://fox59.com/2015/03/16/moed-appears-on-house-floor-says-hes-not-resigning/

  2. Too many attorneys take their position as a license to intimidate and threaten non attorneys in person and by mail. Did find it ironic that a reader moved to comment twice on this article could not complete a paragraph without resorting to insulting name calling (rethuglican) as a substitute for reasoned discussion. Some people will never get the point this action should have made.

  3. People have heard of Magna Carta, and not the Provisions of Oxford & Westminster. Not that anybody really cares. Today, it might be considered ethnic or racial bias to talk about the "Anglo Saxon common law." I don't even see the word English in the blurb above. Anyhow speaking of Edward I-- he was famously intolerant of diversity himself viz the Edict of Expulsion 1290. So all he did too like making parliament a permanent institution-- that all must be discredited. 100 years from now such commemorations will be in the dustbin of history.

  4. Oops, I meant discipline, not disciple. Interesting that those words share such a close relationship. We attorneys are to be disciples of the law, being disciplined to serve the law and its source, the constitutions. Do that, and the goals of Magna Carta are advanced. Do that not and Magna Carta is usurped. Do that not and you should be disciplined. Do that and you should be counted a good disciple. My experiences, once again, do not reveal a process that is adhering to the due process ideals of Magna Carta. Just the opposite, in fact. Braveheart's dying rebel (for a great cause) yell comes to mind.

  5. It is not a sign of the times that many Ind licensed attorneys (I am not) would fear writing what I wrote below, even if they had experiences to back it up. Let's take a minute to thank God for the brave Baron's who risked death by torture to tell the government that it was in the wrong. Today is a career ruination that whistleblowers risk. That is often brought on by denial of licenses or disciple for those who dare speak truth to power. Magna Carta says truth rules power, power too often claims that truth matters not, only Power. Fight such power for the good of our constitutional republics. If we lose them we have only bureaucratic tyranny to pass onto our children. Government attorneys, of all lawyers, should best realize this and work to see our patrimony preserved. I am now a government attorney (once again) in Kansas, and respecting the rule of law is my passion, first and foremost.

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