ILNews

IBA: INTERROGATORIES

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

By Tyler D. Helmond, Voyles Zahn & Paul

Hon. James K. Coachys


Chief Judge, United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Indiana

He is a graduate of Butler University and the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. He practiced law in Johnson County from 1974 until taking the bench there, first as Juvenile Referee in 1987, and then as Superior Court Judge in 1989. He was named to the federal bankruptcy bench in 2000, where he now presides as Chief Judge. He is the Honorable James K. Coachys, and he is the subject of the first ever Interrogatories column–candid questions and answers with some of the most interesting members of the Indiana bench and bar.



You hold court in the Birch Bayh Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse, which is one of the most architecturally significant courthouses in the State. If you had to work in any other courthouse in Indiana which would you choose?

Clearly, our building on East Ohio Street is still a magnificent structure, even at 109 years old. And, as noted in the recent Indiana Lawyer article, the recent improvements to the infrastructure will ensure that it remains one of the jewels in the federal system for years to come. It certainly could never be duplicated today.

I practiced law for a number of years prior to taking the bench, and had the opportunity to try cases in many of the courthouses throughout central and southern Indiana. While probably not being very objective, I believe the courthouse in my own county, Johnson County, is one of the finest at the state level. It was closed in the early 1980s and was completely renovated on the inside, re-opening in 1981. I was extremely fortunate not only to practice in that courthouse, but also to work in it as a judge in one of the superior courts for 12 years.


Q You came to the federal bench from Johnson County. So did Magistrate Judge Ken Foster and District Judge Larry McKinney. What is it about Franklin that seems to produce a disproportionate number of federal judges?

A First of all, I think your list should include Judge Sarah Evans Barker because of her Johnson County ties. Having said that, I’ve been asked this question several times because, for its size, the county does appear to have a disproportionate number of representatives here in the federal courthouse. I don’t think it’s anything in the water and I can’t really come up with a plausible explanation. I just consider myself extremely fortunate to be able to follow in the footsteps of such outstanding jurists.


Q You drive a Saturn. That probably makes you Chief Judge of modest cars on the Southern District bench. Who is runner up?

A It gets great gas mileage. To me, a car gets you from point A to point B. The type of car that does that is just something that isn’t important to me.


Q The bankruptcy bar is on the front line of economic distress. Is the economy improving in your anecdotal experience?

A I believe it is. Individual bankruptcy filings, not only locally but also nationally, have been slowly declining in the past few years. In addition, Chapter 11 business filings have decreased in the Southern District of Indiana since 2010. While these aren’t the only indicators, I do think this is a significant measure of a recovering economy. I am optimistic about the fact that we’re moving in the right direction.


In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, an individual can choose to “reaffirm” a debt during the proceedings. What is the most unconventional request for reaffirmation you have heard of?

A couple of instances quickly come to mind. The first is a debtor who wanted to reaffirm a $24,000 debt on a car that only had a current market value of $14,000. In addition, he did not have enough disposable income to afford the payments but, when asked how he was going to do so, he replied that he planned to cut down on his expenses by canceling his health insurance! That Reaffirmation Agreement was not approved. The second is a single-parent debtor, working only part-time, who had four young children, and wanted to reaffirm a debt of $7,500 on a full length fur coat which had a fair market value of approximately $2,000. Again, that motion was denied. Go figure.


Your 14 year term as bankruptcy judge ends in two years. What are your plans?

I’m seriously considering retirement. My wife and I have never taken the opportunity to travel very much. Doing so, both here and abroad, would be first on our agenda. We’re also seriously considering relocating to a slightly warmer weather locale. Frankly, though, it’s a hard question to answer. Right now we have unlimited options. Family considerations may help, but we’ve discovered that when you have “unlimited options,” the decision becomes much more difficult.


Judge Anthony Metz recently retired from the court. What will you miss most about him?

I’ll miss all the hard work and outstanding leadership he provided as Chief Bankruptcy Judge. Now I’ve inherited the responsibilities that come with the job. I’ll also miss his quick wit and insightful comments regarding our many discussions of the Bankruptcy Code. We have become good friends over the years and I wish him well in his retirement.


Judges sometimes preside over mock trials based on historical trials. If you had to participate in such an event, what trial would you choose and what two local lawyers would you choose to represent the parties?

I’m tempted to say the murder trial in the movie “My Cousin Vinny.” But I assume you’re looking for an example with more historical significance. The first case that comes to mind is The State of Tennessee v. John Thomas Scopes, commonly referred to as the “Scopes Monkey Trial.” The trial is famous for many reasons but perhaps the most significant to us as lawyers is the appearances by the powerful attorneys on both sides. William Jennings Bryan led the prosecution in attempting to banish the theory of evolution from American classrooms. On the other side, defending Mr. Scopes, was the legendary defense attorney, Clarence Darrow. I could envision two of Indianapolis’ most prominent litigators in the starring roles, namely, Greg Garrison portraying William Jennings Bryan, and Jim Voyles as Clarence Darrow. I believe it would make for compelling drama, don’t you?


There has been a proliferation of people and organizations doing cover videos of Carly Rae Jepsen’s “Call Me Maybe.” What would it take to get a Southern District version?

A Even after Googling “cover videos of Carly Rae Jepsen’s ‘Call Me Maybe,’” I have no idea how to answer this question. Obviously, it would take someone much younger than me to get “a Southern District version.”


You graduated from Butler University. Are you ready to concede basketball superiority back to IU?

Notwithstanding IU’s No. 1 pre-season ranking, absolutely not! Even though I am also a graduate of Indiana University McKinney School of Law, my hardwood loyalty remains with the almost two years in a row national champion Butler Bulldogs.•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in Indiana Lawyer editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Indiana State Bar Association

Indianapolis Bar Association

Evansville Bar Association

Allen County Bar Association

Indiana Lawyer on Facebook

facebook
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. All the lawyers involved in this don't add up to a hill of beans; mostly yes-men punching their tickets for future advancement. REMF types. Window dressing. Who in this mess was a real hero? the whistleblower that let the public know about the torture, whom the US sent to Jail. John Kyriakou. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/26/us/ex-officer-for-cia-is-sentenced-in-leak-case.html?_r=0 Now, considering that Torture is Illegal, considering that during Vietnam a soldier was court-martialed and imprisoned for waterboarding, why has the whistleblower gone to jail but none of the torturers have been held to account? It's amazing that Uncle Sam's sunk lower than Vietnam. But that's where we're at. An even more unjust and pointless war conducted in an even more bogus manner. this from npr: "On Jan. 21, 1968, The Washington Post ran a front-page photo of a U.S. soldier supervising the waterboarding of a captured North Vietnamese soldier. The caption said the technique induced "a flooding sense of suffocation and drowning, meant to make him talk." The picture led to an Army investigation and, two months later, the court martial of the soldier." Today, the US itself has become lawless.

  2. "Brain Damage" alright.... The lunatic is on the grass/ The lunatic is on the grass/ Remembering games and daisy chains and laughs/ Got to keep the loonies on the path.... The lunatic is in the hall/ The lunatics are in my hall/ The paper holds their folded faces to the floor/ And every day the paper boy brings more/ And if the dam breaks open many years too soon/ And if there is no room upon the hill/ And if your head explodes with dark forbodings too/ I'll see you on the dark side of the moon!!!

  3. It is amazing how selectively courts can read cases and how two very similar factpatterns can result in quite different renderings. I cited this very same argument in Brown v. Bowman, lost. I guess it is panel, panel, panel when one is on appeal. Sad thing is, I had Sykes. Same argument, she went the opposite. Her Rooker-Feldman jurisprudence is now decidedly unintelligible.

  4. November, 2014, I was charged with OWI/Endangering a person. I was not given a Breathalyzer test and the arresting officer did not believe that alcohol was in any way involved. I was self-overmedicated with prescription medications. I was taken to local hospital for blood draw to be sent to State Tox Lab. My attorney gave me a cookie-cutter plea which amounts to an ALCOHOL-related charge. Totally unacceptable!! HOW can I get my TOX report from the state lab???

  5. My mother got temporary guardianship of my children in 2012. my husband and I got divorced 2015 the judge ordered me to have full custody of all my children. Does this mean the temporary guardianship is over? I'm confused because my divorce papers say I have custody and he gets visits and i get to claim the kids every year on my taxes. So just wondered since I have in black and white that I have custody if I can go get my kids from my moms and not go to jail?

ADVERTISEMENT