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IBA: Interrogatories

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By Tyler D. Helmond, Voyles Zahn & Paul

Lee A. Smith
Executive Director, Brewers of Indiana Guild
 

iba-las-w-fsq-pint-1col.jpg Lee Smith

She is a graduate of Indiana University and the Chicago-Kent College of Law. She has served as a Deputy Public Defender at the Indiana State Public Defender’s Office, the Principal Clerk of the Indiana House of Representatives, and a Donor Relations Officer at Indiana Landmarks. She is Lee Smith, and she has been served with interrogatories.


Q What is the Brewers of Indiana Guild?

A The Guild is the trade association for all of Indiana’s professional craft breweries, 61 at the moment but the ranks are growing an average of one new brewery per month.

Q In your former life, your clients were criminal defendants. Now your only client is Indiana craft beer. For which is it more fun to advocate?

A Well, of course the brewers are more fun, especially since I don’t have to be frisked prior to visits with this client! Our meetings often include sitting down with a pint of beer (a very civilized way to conduct business, by the way!). But you’re right to recognize that both of these career turns include advocacy. I love the job I have now, but I’m also proud of the work I did as a Deputy Public Defender.

Q What is the most interesting or unique Indiana craft beer you’ve tried?

A Our brewers are very creative, so “most unique” changes all the time. One beer that comes to mind is Rob Caputo’s Cucumber Kolsch. Rob is the head brewer at Flat 12 Bierwerks. It didn’t sound like something I’d like, but it was refreshingly light with just a hint of cucumber, and quite delicious! I took the Kolsch to the Great American Beer Festival last October and people were absolutely crazy for it.

Q The Guild sponsors several very popular beer festivals each year. What goes into making those events so successful? Are there any plans to add annual events?

A We produce three annual festivals with a total attendance of around 10,000. Winterfest and the Indiana Microbrewers Festival are in Indy, and our newest fest is in Bloomington. The next festival is the Third Annual Bloomington Craft Beer Festival in April (a great fest in an amazing venue: the historic Woolery Mill). There are two reasons our festivals have gained such a loyal following: the brewers and the volunteers. The brewers are kind of rock stars among the faithful, and festivals are the primary opportunity for brewers and beer enthusiasts to interact (and the brewers enjoy it just as much as the guests). Our festivals are largely managed by a group of volunteers called Hoosier Beer Geek. These people are amazing in their dedication and professionalism. The Guild is still basically a grass-roots organization and we couldn’t do the festivals without HBG.

Q I can’t ask you to pick a favorite from among Guild members, so what is your favorite commercial beer?

A Well, if I picked one of the big “fizzy” beers I’d get laughed out of the Guild. Truth be told, I’m not sure I’ll ever again enjoy a Bud Light. If I can’t get craft, I’ll order the closest thing which usually ends up being a Heineken.

Q You have two children who are at or nearing drinking age. What has been your approach to teach them about alcohol and how it should be used responsibly?

A We’ve tried to demystify alcohol in our household. My husband and I are not big drinkers, but we certainly have alcohol in the home. When our oldest went to college (he is now 23) my husband and I were impressed that the kids seem to be more responsible about driving than we were at that age. Our younger son is 17 and we’ve talked about being responsible, not only for his own behavior but also in watching out for his friends. Incidentally, craft beer is not really what underage drinkers are after. For one thing, it is expensive. And the taste is better suited to a more mature palate. You just don’t hear about kids chugging $7 pints of beer.

Q What are some skills you developed as a litigator and as a legislative lawyer that are useful in leading an organization like the Guild? What advice would you give a lawyer transitioning from practice to leading an organization?

A In some ways my job with the Guild is similar to my days as Principal Clerk of the Indiana House of Representatives. Technically, I report directly to the Guild President, as I reported directly to the Speaker at the State House. But I have a broad constituency of owners and brewers with specific needs and objectives, just like my “100 bosses” at the House of Representatives. I learn a lot just by listening to my brewers and visiting them in their environment. As for advice, I’d tell lawyers considering a change to follow their hearts. A law degree should not constrain one’s choices. Instead, it should open doors. I know lawyers who have jumped tracks into education, NFP management, social services, lobbying and even brewing (of course!—who but lawyers would call their brewpub Black Acre?). I’ve never heard anyone express regret over time spent in the practice of law or a law school education.

Q How much more likely to have a beard are brewers compared with the general population?

A Someone should do a study on that! Wonder if there’s grant money… Off the top of my head, I’d guess the incidence of beards on brewers is second only to orthodox rabbis.

Q Can or bottle?

A Hot topic right now! Bottles are still way more common than cans for crafts, but can proponents (like Sun King, Great Crescent and newcomer Tin Man) are passionate about cans and say it keeps beer fresher.•

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  1. What is the one thing the Hoosier legal status quo hates more than a whistleblower? A lawyer whistleblower taking on the system man to man. That must never be rewarded, must always, always, always be punished, lest the whole rotten tree be felled.

  2. I want to post this to keep this tread alive and hope more of David's former clients might come forward. In my case, this coward of a man represented me from June 2014 for a couple of months before I fired him. I knew something was wrong when he blatantly lied about what he had advised me in my contentious and unfortunate divorce trial. His impact on the proceedings cast a very long shadow and continues to impact me after a lengthy 19 month divorce. I would join a class action suit.

  3. The dispute in LB Indiana regarding lake front property rights is typical of most beach communities along our Great Lakes. Simply put, communication to non owners when visiting the lakefront would be beneficial. The Great Lakes are designated navigational waters (including shorelines). The high-water mark signifies the area one is able to navigate. This means you can walk, run, skip, etc. along the shores. You can't however loiter, camp, sunbath in front of someones property. Informational signs may be helpful to owners and visitors. Our Great Lakes are a treasure that should be enjoyed by all. PS We should all be concerned that the Long Beach, Indiana community is on septic systems.

  4. Dear Fan, let me help you correct the title to your post. "ACLU is [Left] most of the time" will render it accurate. Just google it if you doubt that I am, err, "right" about this: "By the mid-1930s, Roger Nash Baldwin had carved out a well-established reputation as America’s foremost civil libertarian. He was, at the same time, one of the nation’s leading figures in left-of-center circles. Founder and long time director of the American Civil Liberties Union, Baldwin was a firm Popular Fronter who believed that forces on the left side of the political spectrum should unite to ward off the threat posed by right-wing aggressors and to advance progressive causes. Baldwin’s expansive civil liberties perspective, coupled with his determined belief in the need for sweeping socioeconomic change, sometimes resulted in contradictory and controversial pronouncements. That made him something of a lightning rod for those who painted the ACLU with a red brush." http://www.harvardsquarelibrary.org/biographies/roger-baldwin-2/ "[George Soros underwrites the ACLU' which It supports open borders, has rushed to the defense of suspected terrorists and their abettors, and appointed former New Left terrorist Bernardine Dohrn to its Advisory Board." http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/viewSubCategory.asp?id=1237 "The creation of non-profit law firms ushered in an era of progressive public interest firms modeled after already established like the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People ("NAACP") and the American Civil Liberties Union ("ACLU") to advance progressive causes from the environmental protection to consumer advocacy." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cause_lawyering

  5. Mr. Foltz: Your comment that the ACLU is "one of the most wicked and evil organizations in existence today" clearly shows you have no real understanding of what the ACLU does for Americans. The fact that the state is paying out so much in legal fees to the ACLU is clear evidence the ACLU is doing something right, defending all of us from laws that are unconstitutional. The ACLU is the single largest advocacy group for the US Constitution. Every single citizen of the United States owes some level of debt to the ACLU for defending our rights.

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