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IBA: Nod to professionalism

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The Professionalism Committee of the Indianapolis Bar Association extends a Nod to Professionalism to Assistant United States Attorney Bradley A. Blackington. Unlike those of us who do not know what a ton of pure methamphetamine looks like and may not have considered the catastrophic effects it could have in our neighborhoods and schools, Brad serves in a leadership role on the front lines of the war against drugs in our community. With over 12 years of service in the criminal division of the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Indiana, Brad demonstrates daily his commitment to dismantling and prosecuting some of the state’s most significant drug trafficking organizations. He has supervised an unprecedented number of criminal investigations aimed at keeping our streets safe and free from illegal drugs. “Since 1999, Brad has led the United States Attorney’s Office in the fight against violent drug trafficking organizations. In accomplishing this demanding task, Brad has been successful in every Federal courthouse in the district. Although Brad’s conviction rate is impressive, what I find truly outstanding is his professionalism. Although criminal prosecution is inherently adversarial, Brad has always treated his opponents with remarkable courtesy. I believe this character trait reflects Brad’s commitment not only to this office, but to the legal profession he is so proud to serve.” said Joseph H. Hogsett, United States Attorney.

Most recently, Brad successfully prosecuted 27 Indiana residents engaged in a conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine to Hoosiers and others. Based on their criminal history, six of those defendants now face a mandatory sentence of life imprisonment without parole. Robert W. Hammerle, who represented one of the 27, commented, “from a criminal defense attorney’s standpoint, litigating against Brad is like dealing with a Death Star with a conscience. With few exceptions, such a legal fight usually involves your client crashing to his inevitable destruction. Fortunately, Brad’s door is always open to a resolution that gives your client a safe place to land where he can at least try to mitigate an otherwise unavoidable ghastly result.”

Brad’s commitment to representing the interests of the United States government and his professional character are similarly exemplified by his reputation with the Federal judiciary.

“This is certainly an appropriate recognition. It’s been my observation that Brad exhibits professionalism by being very well prepared for hearings and trials. He understands the strengths and weaknesses of his evidence and also has a thorough understanding of the rules of procedure and evidence. His preparation and knowledge of the rules results in his case being presented in an organized and highly professional manner. It’s a pleasure to work with him in the courtroom.” stated Chief Judge Richard L. Young.

Brad and his wife Stephanie reside with their two children in Hamilton County. Brad graduated from Villanova University School of Law where he was Case and Comment Editor of the Law Review, and from The College of William and Mary where he graduated with Highest Honors.•

If you know of someone whom you believe exemplifies one of IBA’s five standards, please e-mail your nomination to iba@indybar.org.

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  1. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  2. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

  3. While this right is guaranteed by our Constitution, it has in recent years been hampered by insurance companies, i.e.; the practice of the plaintiff's own insurance company intervening in an action and filing a lien against any proceeds paid to their insured. In essence, causing an additional financial hurdle for a plaintiff to overcome at trial in terms of overall award. In a very real sense an injured party in exercise of their right to trial by jury may be the only party in a cause that would end up with zero compensation.

  4. Why in the world would someone need a person to correct a transcript when a realtime court reporter could provide them with a transcript (rough draft) immediately?

  5. This article proved very enlightening. Right ahead of sitting the LSAT for the first time, I felt a sense of relief that a score of 141 was admitted to an Indiana Law School and did well under unique circumstances. While my GPA is currently 3.91 I fear standardized testing and hope that I too will get a good enough grade for acceptance here at home. Thanks so much for this informative post.

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