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IBA: Peterson to Highlight Luncheon

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Former Indianapolis Mayor and Eli Lilly executive Bart Peterson will be the featured speaker at the Indianapolis Bar’s luncheon on August 20 at the Hyatt Regency. The luncheon is part of the Bar’s effort to welcome students participating in the Indianapolis Bar’s 3rd Diversity Job Fair, “Metropolitan Meets Midwest” and to highlight the legal community’s commitment to enhancing diversity.

Peterson’s message is anticipated to be of special interest due to his background. As Senior Vice President of Corporate Affairs and Communications, Bart Peterson serves on Eli Lilly and Company’s executive committee. He joined the company in June 2009 after serving as managing director of Strategic Capital Partners following two terms as mayor of Indianapolis. Peterson also earned a law degree at the University of Michigan and was formerly with Ice Miller.

Second-year students from all ABA-accredited U.S. law schools are invited to the job fair; the schools include historically African-American universities, those with a large number of Latino/Hispanic and Asian-American students and those with GLBT affinity groups and students with disabilities. 19 Indianapolis law firms and government agencies have signed to be employer participants.

Last year the job fair attracted 70 law students from across the U.S. to interview. Currently, nearly 100 students have registered to participate this year.

Making the job fair possible are the event sponsors which include Landmark Sponsor – Krieg DeVault as well as Baker & Daniels, Barnes & Thornburg, Bingham McHale, Bose McKinney, Frost Brown Todd, Kightlinger & Gray, Lewis Wagner and Scopelitis Garvin Light Hanson & Feary.

Tickets for the luncheon are $35 per person, and reserved tables are available. Tickets may be purchased online at www.indybar.org

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  1. File under the Sociology of Hoosier Discipline ... “We will be answering the complaint in due course and defending against the commission’s allegations,” said Indianapolis attorney Don Lundberg, who’s representing Hudson in her disciplinary case. FOR THOSE WHO DO NOT KNOW ... Lundberg ran the statist attorney disciplinary machinery in Indy for decades, and is now the "go to guy" for those who can afford him .... the ultimate insider for the well-to-do and/or connected who find themselves in the crosshairs. It would appear that this former prosecutor knows how the game is played in Circle City ... and is sacrificing accordingly. See more on that here ... http://www.theindianalawyer.com/supreme-court-reprimands-attorney-for-falsifying-hours-worked/PARAMS/article/43757 Legal sociologists could have a field day here ... I wonder why such things are never studied? Is a sacrifice to the well connected former regulators a de facto bribe? Such questions, if probed, could bring about a more just world, a more equal playing field, less Stalinist governance. All of the things that our preambles tell us to value could be advanced if only sunshine reached into such dark worlds. As a great jurist once wrote: "Publicity is justly commended as a remedy for social and industrial diseases. Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman." Other People's Money—and How Bankers Use It (1914). Ah, but I am certifiable, according to the Indiana authorities, according to the ISC it can be read, for believing such trite things and for advancing such unwanted thoughts. As a great albeit fictional and broken resistance leaders once wrote: "I am the dead." Winston Smith Let us all be dead to the idea of maintaining a patently unjust legal order.

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