IBA: Strategic Planning

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Times, they are changing. The leadership of the Indianapolis Bar Association has long made an effort to track change and respond to it through strategic planning.

In 1996 the Bar drafted its first three-year strategic plan and has continued that effort every three years since. It’s now time for attention to be given to the creation of the next plan.

The Bar’s strategic planning process involves formal and informal discussions with a variety of members and non-members. Indianapolis Bar Association President Chris Hickey recently appointed the Strategic Planning Committee to help guide the creation of the Bar’s plan.

It will be the responsibility of the committee utilizing information gathered by Bar staff in collaboration with various constituencies within the Bar to draft a plan for review by the Indianapolis Bar’s Board of Directors. The focus of that information is based upon assumptions about what practicing law in Indianapolis will be like 10 years from now. What will have changed? What will be valued? How can the organized bar help?

Accepting the invitation to assist in answering those questions are the following Strategic Plan Task Force members: Jeff Abrams, Kirstin Arthur, Reynold Berry, Jake Bradley, Scott Chinn, Vanessa Davis, Aaron Freeman, Suzanne Gaidoo, Mike Hebenstreit, John Kautzman, Tamara McMillian, Judge Tim Oakes, Colleen Powers, Lindsay Ramsey, Jason Reyome, Judge Marc Rothenberg, Eric Schmadeke, Mary Schmid, Judge Heather Welch, Bob York, and Brian Zoeller.

The task force will meet in mid-August and a draft plan is anticipated to be considered by the Board of Directors by its October meeting. The plan will include goals related to structure/governance, finances, and programs/services.•


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  1. This is ridiculous. Most JDs not practicing law don't know squat to justify calling themselves a lawyer. Maybe they should try visiting the inside of a courtroom before they go around calling themselves lawyers. This kind of promotional BS just increases the volume of people with JDs that are underqualified thereby dragging all the rest of us down likewise.

  2. I think it is safe to say that those Hoosier's with the most confidence in the Indiana judicial system are those Hoosier's who have never had the displeasure of dealing with the Hoosier court system.

  3. I have an open CHINS case I failed a urine screen I have since got clean completed IOP classes now in after care passed home inspection my x sister in law has my children I still don't even have unsupervised when I have been clean for over 4 months my x sister wants to keep the lids for good n has my case working with her I just discovered n have proof that at one of my hearing dcs case worker stated in court to the judge that a screen was dirty which caused me not to have unsupervised this was at the beginning two weeks after my initial screen I thought the weed could have still been in my system was upset because they were suppose to check levels n see if it was going down since this was only a few weeks after initial instead they said dirty I recently requested all of my screens from redwood because I take prescriptions that will show up n I was having my doctor look at levels to verify that matched what I was prescripted because dcs case worker accused me of abuseing when I got my screens I found out that screen I took that dcs case worker stated in court to judge that caused me to not get granted unsupervised was actually negative what can I do about this this is a serious issue saying a parent failed a screen in court to judge when they didn't please advise

  4. I have a degree at law, recent MS in regulatory studies. Licensed in KS, admitted b4 S& 7th circuit, but not to Indiana bar due to political correctness. Blacklisted, nearly unemployable due to hostile state action. Big Idea: Headwinds can overcome, esp for those not within the contours of the bell curve, the Lego Movie happiness set forth above. That said, even without the blacklisting for holding ideas unacceptable to the Glorious State, I think the idea presented above that a law degree open many vistas other than being a galley slave to elitist lawyers is pretty much laughable. (Did the law professors of Indiana pay for this to be published?)

  5. Joe, you might want to do some reading on the fate of Hoosier whistleblowers before you get your expectations raised up.