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IBA: Strategic Planning

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Times, they are changing. The leadership of the Indianapolis Bar Association has long made an effort to track change and respond to it through strategic planning.

In 1996 the Bar drafted its first three-year strategic plan and has continued that effort every three years since. It’s now time for attention to be given to the creation of the next plan.

The Bar’s strategic planning process involves formal and informal discussions with a variety of members and non-members. Indianapolis Bar Association President Chris Hickey recently appointed the Strategic Planning Committee to help guide the creation of the Bar’s plan.

It will be the responsibility of the committee utilizing information gathered by Bar staff in collaboration with various constituencies within the Bar to draft a plan for review by the Indianapolis Bar’s Board of Directors. The focus of that information is based upon assumptions about what practicing law in Indianapolis will be like 10 years from now. What will have changed? What will be valued? How can the organized bar help?

Accepting the invitation to assist in answering those questions are the following Strategic Plan Task Force members: Jeff Abrams, Kirstin Arthur, Reynold Berry, Jake Bradley, Scott Chinn, Vanessa Davis, Aaron Freeman, Suzanne Gaidoo, Mike Hebenstreit, John Kautzman, Tamara McMillian, Judge Tim Oakes, Colleen Powers, Lindsay Ramsey, Jason Reyome, Judge Marc Rothenberg, Eric Schmadeke, Mary Schmid, Judge Heather Welch, Bob York, and Brian Zoeller.

The task force will meet in mid-August and a draft plan is anticipated to be considered by the Board of Directors by its October meeting. The plan will include goals related to structure/governance, finances, and programs/services.•

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  1. As one of the many consumers affected by this breach, I found my bank data had been lifted and used to buy over $200 of various merchandise in New York. I did a pretty good job of tracing the purchases to stores around a college campus just from the info on my bank statement. Hm. Mr. Hill, I would like my $200 back! It doesn't belong to the state, in my opinion. Give it back to the consumers affected. I had to freeze my credit and take out data protection, order a new debit card and wait until it arrived. I deserve something for my trouble!

  2. Don't we have bigger issues to concern ourselves with?

  3. Anyone who takes the time to study disciplinary and bar admission cases in Indiana ... much of which is, as a matter of course and by intent, off the record, would have a very difficult time drawing lines that did not take into account things which are not supposed to matter, such as affiliations, associations, associates and the like. Justice Hoosier style is a far departure than what issues in most other parts of North America. (More like Central America, in fact.) See, e.g., http://www.theindianalawyer.com/indiana-attorney-illegally-practicing-in-florida-suspended-for-18-months/PARAMS/article/42200 When while the Indiana court system end the cruel practice of killing prophets of due process and those advocating for blind justice?

  4. Wouldn't this call for an investigation of Government corruption? Chief Justice Loretta Rush, wrote that the case warranted the high court’s review because the method the Indiana Court of Appeals used to reach its decision was “a significant departure from the law.” Specifically, David wrote that the appellate panel ruled after reweighing of the evidence, which is NOT permissible at the appellate level. **But yet, they look the other way while an innocent child was taken by a loving mother who did nothing wrong"

  5. Different rules for different folks....

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