ILNews

IBA: Strategic Planning

Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Times, they are changing. The leadership of the Indianapolis Bar Association has long made an effort to track change and respond to it through strategic planning.

In 1996 the Bar drafted its first three-year strategic plan and has continued that effort every three years since. It’s now time for attention to be given to the creation of the next plan.

The Bar’s strategic planning process involves formal and informal discussions with a variety of members and non-members. Indianapolis Bar Association President Chris Hickey recently appointed the Strategic Planning Committee to help guide the creation of the Bar’s plan.

It will be the responsibility of the committee utilizing information gathered by Bar staff in collaboration with various constituencies within the Bar to draft a plan for review by the Indianapolis Bar’s Board of Directors. The focus of that information is based upon assumptions about what practicing law in Indianapolis will be like 10 years from now. What will have changed? What will be valued? How can the organized bar help?

Accepting the invitation to assist in answering those questions are the following Strategic Plan Task Force members: Jeff Abrams, Kirstin Arthur, Reynold Berry, Jake Bradley, Scott Chinn, Vanessa Davis, Aaron Freeman, Suzanne Gaidoo, Mike Hebenstreit, John Kautzman, Tamara McMillian, Judge Tim Oakes, Colleen Powers, Lindsay Ramsey, Jason Reyome, Judge Marc Rothenberg, Eric Schmadeke, Mary Schmid, Judge Heather Welch, Bob York, and Brian Zoeller.

The task force will meet in mid-August and a draft plan is anticipated to be considered by the Board of Directors by its October meeting. The plan will include goals related to structure/governance, finances, and programs/services.•

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to Indiana Lawyer
  1. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  2. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  3. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  4. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  5. I totally agree with John Smith.

ADVERTISEMENT