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IBA: Taking the Next Steps on Your Career Path

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If you’re one of the many lawyers looking for a job or new direction, there are many resources available that can help you take the next steps along your career path.

One of the best things about a law degree is its versatility, and as you transition — or consider transitioning — to a new career — it’s important to remember the exceptional number of choices open to you.

You may want to explore going solo or you may want to set up a related business such as legal writing or research. You may want to do a lot of networking or you may want to use the Internet to find contract work while you determine what you want to do next.

For many lawyers, going solo is an option. There are many seminars and workshops offered on the subject. There is also a Sole/Small Firm Practice Section within the Indianapolis Bar to provide assistance for those considering these practice environments.

Indianapolis Bar Sole/Small Firm Practice Section Chair Kenan Farrell participated in a panel at last week’s Bench Bar addressing the need for a clear business plan when embarking on any career path, but most particularly a solo practice.

Jeff Meunier of the Indianapolis Bar’s Senior Counsel Division will be the featured speaker at an upcoming seminar, “So You Want to Hang Your Shingle”. Based upon a similar program offered last year, this CLE program will feature tips of interest to young lawyers seeking to launch their own practice independent of an established law firm. Registration is now open online at www.indybar.org.•

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  1. I'm not sure what's more depressing: the fact that people would pay $35,000 per year to attend an unaccredited law school, or the fact that the same people "are hanging in there and willing to follow the dean’s lead in going forward" after the same school fails to gain accreditation, rendering their $70,000 and counting education worthless. Maybe it's a good thing these people can't sit for the bar.

  2. Such is not uncommon on law school startups. Students and faculty should tap Bruce Green, city attorney of Lufkin, Texas. He led a group of studnets and faculty and sued the ABA as a law student. He knows the ropes, has advised other law school startups. Very astute and principled attorney of unpopular clients, at least in his past, before Lufkin tapped him to run their show.

  3. Not that having the appellate records on Odyssey won't be welcome or useful, but I would rather they first bring in the stray counties that aren't yet connected on the trial court level.

  4. Aristotle said 350 bc: "The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of an modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

  5. Oh yes, lifetime tenure. The Founders gave that to the federal judges .... at that time no federal district courts existed .... so we are talking the Supreme Court justices only in context ....so that they could rule against traditional marriage and for the other pet projects of the sixties generation. Right. Hmmmm, but I must admit, there is something from that time frame that seems to recommend itself in this context ..... on yes, from a document the Founders penned in 1776: " He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good."

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