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IBF provides classes for educational programs

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An annual highlight for participants, mentors, and organizers, the summer institutes for Project Citizen and We The People have once again actively prepared teachers to present civics lessons so students can understand and become responsible citizens.

The Indiana Bar Foundation civics education team hosted the summer institutes at the Indiana University School of Education in Bloomington – one for Project Citizen in June and another for We The People in July. Participants come from Indiana and neighboring states.

Problem solving

Project Citizen is a program that enables students to solve a problem in their community in a creative way while learning how government officials are able to solve the problems of their constituents. The teachers also learn what their students will experience as they work on community projects that help instill a sense of pride in themselves and their communities.

This year brought one change. Indiana was among just a handful of states to include a new focus: international human rights. It’s a subject that is often talked about among students and teachers in other countries, particularly countries that have written their constitutions since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was written more than 60 years ago.

Almost two dozen registered teachers were engaged in the weeklong conference. The opening day discussion was led by Dr. Dan Prinzing, education director of the Idaho Human Rights Education Center. Prinzing, along with Indiana teachers Scott Frye and Lynnette Wallace, served as mentors to the teachers at the institute.

Organizers Erin Braun, Kyle Burson, and Eric Steele said the mentors were an invaluable resource to the teachers at both institutes, as they have gone through the program themselves and were able to help the teachers troubleshoot and consider any issues they may face when back in their own classrooms.

Prinzing talked about how teachers can share with students what they need to know in terms of basic knowledge, such as laws and how policy works, how to use that knowledge to cause change through voting and other means, and why the students need to care or else the other two things don’t matter.

As an example, one teacher in the room said she had a student who was stopped by police. As a result of that student’s experience, she rewrote her curriculum for that class and the students worked on a list of things for juveniles younger than 18 to know if they ever needed to interact with law enforcement.

Frye then explained the two civics standards in Indiana are the steps of how to excel as a citizen – voice opinion, monitor government, and effect and evoke change; and the character traits of a good citizen – participation, cooperation, responsibility, and the newest, respect for others.

Wallace also explained how the projects for Project Citizen work: students first choose a problem to address, such as a littered park; they come up with a few alternative solutions; they propose which policy would be the best; and then they decide on an action plan to present to community leaders who can help implement the project.

Civics We The People’s summer institute featured creative ways to teach civics to students. Team Adams members are, from left, Mickey Campbell, Paul Lawrence Dunbar High, Lexington, Ky.; Kevin Tholin, Riley High School, South Bend; Deborah Cattell, Heritage Middle School, Painesville, Ohio; Leah Tennion-Hogan, Lew Wallace Middle School, Gary; Shawn Denny, Shortridge Middle School, Indianapolis; and team mentor, Michael Gordon, Munster High School, Munster. (Submitted photo)

Other highlights of the week included: Indiana Rep. Chester Dobis, D-Merrillville, who has served since 1970; and former Project Citizen students who shared their experiences with the program.

Active learning

This summer’s weeklong We The People institute hosted about 50 teachers from elementary, middle, and high schools in Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky.

Similar to the Project Citizen institute, teachers learned what their students will be taught, including the six units for We The People: philosophical and historical underpinnings of the Constitution; writing of and debates about the Constitution; Civil War and President Abraham Lincoln through the civil rights movement; modern day functions of the branches of government and federalism; Bill of Rights and civil liberties; and current applications of the units and international relations.

Throughout the institute, they also prepare and ultimately present mock congressional hearings before those who’ve judged or worked with students in the past, including many attorneys.

The teachers also learned how to present to the students. For instance, during the discussion about a unit that covers the modern functions of the branches of government, Robert Dion, a political science professor at the University of Evansville, said this unit is of interest to students more than some others because it has to do with current events. If nothing else, students do or at least should know who the president is and may have also heard their parents gripe about Congress as a whole or certain members in the news.

He also used pop culture references to explain the difference between empirical questions of fact and normative questions of value, as well as the imperfections of the Constitution.

For instance, he said some questions were too “Pat,” and showed a photo of the androgynous Saturday Night Live character, Pat, to illustrate that some of the questions would be ambiguous, but that was OK because students understand there isn’t always a clear-cut answer to the questions they ask. He added some of these “Pat” questions will make for more work for the teacher and students, but the learning process and research will be worthwhile in the end.

Shawn Denney, an eighth-grade social studies teacher at Shortridge, the Indianapolis Public School system’s magnet school that focuses on law and public policy, said he looks forward to teaching the We The People curriculum to his students.

“We The People encourages students to be critical thinkers in its approach to teaching civics in the classroom,” he said via e-mail. “Instead of being lectured about history, students participate in history by analyzing the ideas of the original framers of the Constitution and then presenting those same concepts in a group setting. We do this in the individual classroom, between other classes, and formally and informally with other schools. The participator nature of We The People seems to help students retain the information. Team work, analytical thinking, research, and public speaking skills are some of the side effects We The People gives Shortridge students.”

While Project Citizen and We The People are funded via congressional allocation, the civics education staff who organized the event is supported by the Indiana Bar Foundation. Their funding partly comes from IOLTA funds, which are low this year because of low interest rates. They also are receiving funds from the “An Hour for Civics” program, available online at www.inbf.org/an_hour_for_civics.

As of mid-July, volunteers had raised more than $21,770, “which makes us almost halfway to our goal,” said Theresa Browning, IBF director of development and communications. “More than 80 attorneys have donated ‘an hour’ so far. I’m not sure what the average billable hour is, but for this campaign it’s $265 – slightly higher than last year.”

She said this is the second year of the campaign and added two firms have signed on for five years of support as charter “Visionary Supporters”: Taft Stettinius & Hollister, and Barnes & Thornburg. As such, the firms commit to a gift of $2,000 a year for five years knowing that supports at least one classroom of students. She said the IBF will sign up firms statewide until December.

The money raised by the campaign will help pay for staff time and resources to organize events such as the summer institutes, teacher training and development, state and district competitions, and all the phone calls and staff time answering teachers and administrators questions as new programs begin.

Bob Beasley, IBF president and in-house counsel for Albany-based Paws Inc., said he thought the civics education programs were a hidden gem in Indiana and wished that more people knew about them. He said he has participated as a judge at the state and national level for We The People, and that any time he mentioned he was from Indiana, participants from other states knew of the program’s strength right away: The Indiana team has consistently placed in the top 10 almost every year since the IBF took it on several years ago.•

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  1. I have been on this program while on parole from 2011-2013. No person should be forced mentally to share private details of their personal life with total strangers. Also giving permission for a mental therapist to report to your parole agent that your not participating in group therapy because you don't have the financial mean to be in the group therapy. I was personally singled out and sent back three times for not having money and also sent back within the six month when you aren't to be sent according to state law. I will work to het this INSOMM's removed from this state. I also had twelve or thirteen parole agents with a fifteen month period. Thanks for your time.

  2. Our nation produces very few jurists of the caliber of Justice DOUGLAS and his peers these days. Here is that great civil libertarian, who recognized government as both a blessing and, when corrupted by ideological interests, a curse: "Once the investigator has only the conscience of government as a guide, the conscience can become ‘ravenous,’ as Cromwell, bent on destroying Thomas More, said in Bolt, A Man For All Seasons (1960), p. 120. The First Amendment mirrors many episodes where men, harried and harassed by government, sought refuge in their conscience, as these lines of Thomas More show: ‘MORE: And when we stand before God, and you are sent to Paradise for doing according to your conscience, *575 and I am damned for not doing according to mine, will you come with me, for fellowship? ‘CRANMER: So those of us whose names are there are damned, Sir Thomas? ‘MORE: I don't know, Your Grace. I have no window to look into another man's conscience. I condemn no one. ‘CRANMER: Then the matter is capable of question? ‘MORE: Certainly. ‘CRANMER: But that you owe obedience to your King is not capable of question. So weigh a doubt against a certainty—and sign. ‘MORE: Some men think the Earth is round, others think it flat; it is a matter capable of question. But if it is flat, will the King's command make it round? And if it is round, will the King's command flatten it? No, I will not sign.’ Id., pp. 132—133. DOUGLAS THEN WROTE: Where government is the Big Brother,11 privacy gives way to surveillance. **909 But our commitment is otherwise. *576 By the First Amendment we have staked our security on freedom to promote a multiplicity of ideas, to associate at will with kindred spirits, and to defy governmental intrusion into these precincts" Gibson v. Florida Legislative Investigation Comm., 372 U.S. 539, 574-76, 83 S. Ct. 889, 908-09, 9 L. Ed. 2d 929 (1963) Mr. Justice DOUGLAS, concurring. I write: Happy Memorial Day to all -- God please bless our fallen who lived and died to preserve constitutional governance in our wonderful series of Republics. And God open the eyes of those government officials who denounce the constitutions of these Republics by arbitrary actions arising out capricious motives.

  3. From back in the day before secularism got a stranglehold on Hoosier jurists comes this great excerpt via Indiana federal court judge Allan Sharp, dedicated to those many Indiana government attorneys (with whom I have dealt) who count the law as a mere tool, an optional tool that is not to be used when political correctness compels a more acceptable result than merely following the path that the law directs: ALLEN SHARP, District Judge. I. In a scene following a visit by Henry VIII to the home of Sir Thomas More, playwriter Robert Bolt puts the following words into the mouths of his characters: Margaret: Father, that man's bad. MORE: There is no law against that. ROPER: There is! God's law! MORE: Then God can arrest him. ROPER: Sophistication upon sophistication! MORE: No, sheer simplicity. The law, Roper, the law. I know what's legal not what's right. And I'll stick to what's legal. ROPER: Then you set man's law above God's! MORE: No, far below; but let me draw your attention to a fact I'm not God. The currents and eddies of right and wrong, which you find such plain sailing, I can't navigate. I'm no voyager. But in the thickets of law, oh, there I'm a forester. I doubt if there's a man alive who could follow me there, thank God... ALICE: (Exasperated, pointing after Rich) While you talk, he's gone! MORE: And go he should, if he was the Devil himself, until he broke the law! ROPER: So now you'd give the Devil benefit of law! MORE: Yes. What would you do? Cut a great road through the law to get after the Devil? ROPER: I'd cut down every law in England to do that! MORE: (Roused and excited) Oh? (Advances on Roper) And when the last law was down, and the Devil turned round on you where would you hide, Roper, the laws being flat? (He leaves *1257 him) This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast man's laws, not God's and if you cut them down and you're just the man to do it d'you really think you would stand upright in the winds that would blow then? (Quietly) Yes, I'd give the Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake. ROPER: I have long suspected this; this is the golden calf; the law's your god. MORE: (Wearily) Oh, Roper, you're a fool, God's my god... (Rather bitterly) But I find him rather too (Very bitterly) subtle... I don't know where he is nor what he wants. ROPER: My God wants service, to the end and unremitting; nothing else! MORE: (Dryly) Are you sure that's God! He sounds like Moloch. But indeed it may be God And whoever hunts for me, Roper, God or Devil, will find me hiding in the thickets of the law! And I'll hide my daughter with me! Not hoist her up the mainmast of your seagoing principles! They put about too nimbly! (Exit More. They all look after him). Pgs. 65-67, A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS A Play in Two Acts, Robert Bolt, Random House, New York, 1960. Linley E. Pearson, Atty. Gen. of Indiana, Indianapolis, for defendants. Childs v. Duckworth, 509 F. Supp. 1254, 1256 (N.D. Ind. 1981) aff'd, 705 F.2d 915 (7th Cir. 1983)

  4. "Meanwhile small- and mid-size firms are getting squeezed and likely will not survive unless they become a boutique firm." I've been a business attorney in small, and now mid-size firm for over 30 years, and for over 30 years legal consultants have been preaching this exact same mantra of impending doom for small and mid-sized firms -- verbatim. This claim apparently helps them gin up merger opportunities from smaller firms who become convinced that they need to become larger overnight. The claim that large corporations are interested in cost-saving and efficiency has likewise been preached for decades, and is likewise bunk. If large corporations had any real interest in saving money they wouldn't use large law firms whose rates are substantially higher than those of high-quality mid-sized firms.

  5. The family is the foundation of all human government. That is the Grand Design. Modern governments throw off this Design and make bureaucratic war against the family, as does Hollywood and cultural elitists such as third wave feminists. Since WWII we have been on a ship of fools that way, with both the elite and government and their social engineering hacks relentlessly attacking the very foundation of social order. And their success? See it in the streets of Fergusson, on the food stamp doles (mostly broken families)and in the above article. Reject the Grand Design for true social function, enter the Glorious State to manage social dysfunction. Our Brave New World will be a prison camp, and we will welcome it as the only way to manage given the anarchy without it.

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