Indiana attorneys help Haiti

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Attorneys around Indiana with connections to Haiti are helping with that country's relief efforts following an earthquake that registered as a magnitude 7 that destroyed countless buildings and injured and killed still unknown numbers of people in an already impoverished country.

Christopher Stevenson of Wilson Kehoe & Winingham in Indianapolis traveled to LaMare, Haiti, in March 2009 with other members of Evangelical Covenant Church of Lafayette. That trip was affiliated with Covenant World Relief, which his firm has chosen to support. An Indiana Lawyer article, "Attorneys are on a mission," included Stevenson's experience on that trip.

"Covenant is currently using funds to provide emergency relief kits that will be distributed through World Relief International. The kits include food, water, and blankets," Stevenson said via e-mail.

While the village he visited was not hit as hard by the earthquake as other parts of the country, he said he had contact with many people in Port-au-Prince and spent some time there when he was visiting.

To support Covenant World Relief, Wilson Kehoe & Winingham will donate $25 per employee, plus whatever employees decide to give.

Another attorney who has recently been to Haiti, Jeffrey J. Newell of Ball Eggleston in Lafayette, has been working on a network of Catholic churches with sister churches in Haiti.

A week before the earthquake, Newell had returned to Indiana from his 12th trip to St. Joseph Church of Pendus, about 120 miles from Port-au-Prince and about 10 miles northwest from Gros Morne. He was among about a dozen others with experience in Haiti who realized it would be better to have one large organization than about 60 individual churches figuring out what to do.

Newell helped start Indiana Haiti Earthquake Relief Organization, or Indiana HERO, to organize donation drives for money, supplies, and to help coordinate medical teams who will travel to Haiti when it is possible.

More information about earthquake relief is available on the Web site for Newell's church.

The Law Office of Bryan K. Bullock in Merrillville has supported relief efforts in conjunction with the Salvation Army. That firm is soliciting donations of food, water, clothing, and toiletries to send to Haiti.

Bryan Bullock said via e-mail. "I will accept donations until Feb. 14, 2010. As you know, time is of the essence. Please participate in this effort. I cannot accept monetary donations, but I encourage each of you to make donations to the International Red Cross and World Vision."

While Bullock said he's never been to Haiti, he's had an interest in the country for a long time and sees the need to help. He also helped solicit donations for other natural disasters in Haiti, such as a 2005 hurricane.

Contributions can be made to the law office, 7863 Broadway, Suite 222, Merrillville, IN 46410. The Salvation Army will coordinate deliveries of the items. For more information, contact the law firm at (219) 472-1546.

A more in-depth look at what Indiana attorneys are doing for Haiti will appear in the Feb. 3-16, 2010, edition of Indiana Lawyer.


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  1. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  2. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  3. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.

  4. rensselaer imdiana is doing same thing to children from the judge to attorney and dfs staff they need to be investigated as well

  5. Sex offenders are victims twice, once when they are molested as kids, and again when they repeat the behavior, you never see money spent on helping them do you. That's why this circle continues