Indiana Supreme Court

Rush: Chemistry among justices to remain intact with Slaughter

August 11, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The necessary team chemistry required for the Indiana Supreme Court to function properly appears to remain intact with the appointment of Geoffrey Slaughter to the bench, Chief Justice Loretta Rush said Thursday during his investiture ceremony.
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Slaughter’s investiture ceremony Thursday

August 8, 2016
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court’s newest justice will have his investiture ceremony Thursday.
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Justices reinstate conviction divided COA reversed

August 5, 2016
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Supreme Court on Thursday affirmed a man’s misdemeanor failure to identify conviction that had been reversed by a divided panel of the Court of Appeals.
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Justices decline newborn blood sample case

August 1, 2016
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court will not hear the appeal of an Indiana couple who wanted their child’s blood, taken when she was born, destroyed instead of being stored by the state.
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Justices rule State Farm UIM policy ambiguous

July 26, 2016
Dave Stafford
A State Farm auto insurance policy’s language regarding uninsured motorist coverage is ambiguous, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, affirming a Lake Superior trial court’s denial of the insurer’s motion for summary judgment in a personal injury case.
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Justices disbar Goshen attorney for UPL while suspended

July 21, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court has decided the sanction for a Goshen attorney’s repeated practice of law while suspended: disbarment.
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Justices uphold Jay County teachers’ CBA

July 21, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
In a 4-1 decision, the Indiana Supreme Court affirmed the last best offer made by the Jay School Corp. regarding a collective bargaining agreement for the 2013-14 school year. The teachers took issue with a provision involving the salary of teachers hired mid-school year.
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Indiana Supreme Court disbars Tim Durham

July 20, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court disbarred Indianapolis attorney Tim Durham Wednesday because of his “fraudulent looting of funds entrusted to him by investors.” Durham is currently serving a 50-year sentence for 10 counts of wire and securities fraud.
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Indiana high court rejects rehearing in lawmaker emails case

July 13, 2016
 Associated Press, IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court has declined to rehear a case that sought to force lawmakers to release their email correspondence with lobbying groups and businesses.
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Justices adopt COA opinion, affirm intimidation conviction

July 12, 2016
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Supreme Court on Tuesday affirmed the intimidation conviction of a man who threatened to kill his sister’s landlord if she returned to the Indianapolis apartment.
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Senior judge named to replace Willis on bench

July 11, 2016
IL Staff
It’s a bit of musical chairs in Henry Circuit Court to fill the vacancy Judge Mary G. Willis will create when she leaves July 22 to become the Indiana Supreme Court’s new chief administrative officer.
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Justices: Houseguest couldn’t consent to home search

July 8, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court held Thursday that a houseguest at a home in which police discovered drugs did not have the apparent authority to consent to a search of the house.
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Indiana Supreme Court takes dispute between ESPN and Notre Dame

July 5, 2016
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court will decide whether the police records of University of Notre Dame Police Department are subject to the state’s Access to Public Records Act. The justices accepted transfer to the dispute between ESPN and Notre Dame last week.
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Justices remove Dreyer from State v. IBM case

July 5, 2016
Dave Stafford
The Indiana Supreme Court on Tuesday removed the judge who has presided for six years over the litigation between the state and IBM over the failed $1.3 billion welfare-modernization contract.
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Supreme Court hears arguments in threat case

June 30, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Supreme Court heard arguments Thursday morning on whether to grant transfer in a case on the question of whether an arrestee's statement could be considered a true threat because there is no evidence that the officer felt threatened by it.
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Deadline for mandatory e-filing nears for Hamilton County, Indiana appellate courts

June 29, 2016
Dave Stafford
Ready or not, the era of e-filing begins July 1 for everyone submitting court documents in Hamilton County and in Indiana’s appellate courts. There’s evidence that despite the buildup over recent months, many lawyers and filers may be caught off guard.
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Justices affirm consecutive LWOP sentences

June 28, 2016
Jennifer Nelson
The Indiana Supreme Court until Tuesday had never directly addressed the issue of whether two sentences of life imprisonment without parole can be imposed consecutively under Indiana law. Justices decided today that I.C. 35-50-1-2(c) permits it.
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Supreme Court extends Charlie White’s suspension

June 28, 2016
Dave Stafford
Former Indiana Secretary of State Charlie White may never be allowed to practice law again, the Indiana Supreme Court suggested Tuesday in extending his suspension another two years without automatic reinstatement.
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Justices rule jury instruction not fundamental error

June 22, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Indiana Supreme Court found a jury instruction that jurors “shall presume” that a man’s alcohol concentration equivalent was above the legal limit if his chemical test, taken hours later, was at 0.08 or higher was not fundamental error. As such, it affirmed his conviction.
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Henry County judge to lead new Indiana Supreme Court office

June 17, 2016
IL Staff
Henry Circuit Judge Mary Willis has been named the first chief administrative officer of the Indiana Supreme Court.
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Justices toss meth conviction, advise courts on indigent depositions

June 16, 2016
Dave Stafford
A Huntington County man’s conviction for dealing meth and 40-year sentence were reversed Thursday by the Indiana Supreme Court, which remanded the case for a new trial and used the decision to send a message to trial courts. The court ruled the denial of depositions of state witnesses by indigent defendants must be supported in the record by findings of fact.
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New Coalition for Court Access aims to improve delivery of civil legal services

June 15, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
After establishing three committees to tackle the persistent problem of unrepresented litigants trying to maneuver their way through the state’s judicial system, the Indiana Supreme Court has decided to start over.
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Can records of civil forfeitures be expunged?

June 15, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
The Indiana Supreme Court is considering whether files on property judgments "relate to the person’s felony conviction."
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Slaughter sworn in as 109th justice

June 13, 2016
IL Staff
Geoffrey G. Slaughter was sworn in as an Indiana Supreme Court justice Monday morning in a brief, private ceremony, court spokeswoman Kathryn Dolan said. Chief Justice Loretta H. Rush administered the oath of office, allowing Slaughter, formerly a partner with Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, to begin deciding cases and handling administrative matters with his colleagues.
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Slaughter to join Indiana Supreme Court Monday

June 7, 2016
IL Staff
Geoffrey G. Slaughter will be sworn as an Indiana Supreme Court justice next week, the court announced Tuesday. Chief Justice Loretta H. Rush will administer the oath of office Monday in a brief, private ceremony, which will allow Slaughter, formerly a partner with Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP, to begin deciding cases and handling administrative matters with his colleagues.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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