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Indiana Tech plans to open law school in 2013

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Indiana may soon have a fifth law school. Indiana Tech’s Board of Trustees voted May 13 to move forward with establishing a law school in Fort Wayne.

The board voted unanimously to create a law school, citing Indiana Tech’s academic strengths; that Indiana is underserved in terms of the numbers of lawyers relative to Indiana’s population and economic activity; and that around half of Indiana residents pursuing a law degree go to out-of-state schools approved by the American Bar Association, according to a release on the school’s website.

“The establishment of the Indiana Tech school of law is a tremendously significant development not just for this university but for the community of Fort Wayne and the state of Indiana,” President Arthur E. Snyder said. “We have given this decision careful research and consideration, and we believe we can develop a school that will attract and retain talented individuals who will contribute to our region’s economic development.”

The school is now searching for a dean to lead economic development of the academic program and is pursuing accreditation by the ABA. Its goal is to open Indiana Tech law school in the fall of 2013 with 100 first-year students.

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  • Is it April's Fools Day
    Rather than be totally negative and list the top 100 reason's why Indiana does not need a new lawschool I am going to let the free market forces speak for themselves. I am guessing no lawyer (Save one's that command six figure academic salaries) was involved in this decision.

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  1. As one of the many consumers affected by this breach, I found my bank data had been lifted and used to buy over $200 of various merchandise in New York. I did a pretty good job of tracing the purchases to stores around a college campus just from the info on my bank statement. Hm. Mr. Hill, I would like my $200 back! It doesn't belong to the state, in my opinion. Give it back to the consumers affected. I had to freeze my credit and take out data protection, order a new debit card and wait until it arrived. I deserve something for my trouble!

  2. Don't we have bigger issues to concern ourselves with?

  3. Anyone who takes the time to study disciplinary and bar admission cases in Indiana ... much of which is, as a matter of course and by intent, off the record, would have a very difficult time drawing lines that did not take into account things which are not supposed to matter, such as affiliations, associations, associates and the like. Justice Hoosier style is a far departure than what issues in most other parts of North America. (More like Central America, in fact.) See, e.g., http://www.theindianalawyer.com/indiana-attorney-illegally-practicing-in-florida-suspended-for-18-months/PARAMS/article/42200 When while the Indiana court system end the cruel practice of killing prophets of due process and those advocating for blind justice?

  4. Wouldn't this call for an investigation of Government corruption? Chief Justice Loretta Rush, wrote that the case warranted the high court’s review because the method the Indiana Court of Appeals used to reach its decision was “a significant departure from the law.” Specifically, David wrote that the appellate panel ruled after reweighing of the evidence, which is NOT permissible at the appellate level. **But yet, they look the other way while an innocent child was taken by a loving mother who did nothing wrong"

  5. Different rules for different folks....

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