Indiana Trial Courts

Court video pilot project will last through 2013

September 27, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The pilot project announced this summer by the Indiana Supreme Court that includes using video transcripts in three trial courts as the official court record will run through Dec. 31, 2013.
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Loretta Rush is Indiana's next justice

September 26, 2012
Dave Stafford
Colleagues say the Supreme Court appointee brings life balance, temperament and skill to the job.
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Vanderburgh County judicial candidates to debate

September 17, 2012
IL Staff
The Evansville Bar Association is hosting a judicial debate for the Vanderburgh Superior judicial candidates in contested races on Wednesday.
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COA rules trial court erred in suppressing blood evidence in Bisard case

September 12, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The blood of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department officer accused of driving drunk and killing one motorcyclist and injuring two others should be allowed at his trial for reckless homicide and other alcohol-related charges, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday morning on interlocutory appeal.
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Lawsuits test gun restrictions at polling places, local regulations

September 12, 2012
Dave Stafford
Can you carry a gun to the ballot box? With a few narrow exceptions, the answer appears to be yes. A lawsuit filed last month in St. Joseph Superior Court could clarify further whether a 2011 law that voids local firearm regulations would make efforts to keep guns out of voting precincts illegal.
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Courts tend to side with HOAs on disputes

September 12, 2012
Marilyn Odendahl
No one disputes that Country Squire Lakes Community in Jennings County has decayed from a pleasant welcoming place to live into a mess of broken down mobile homes where there is fear of crime. They disagree if the change is radical enough to excuse homeowners from paying dues and assessments to their homeowners association.
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Marion County slating reform gets new push

August 29, 2012
Dave Stafford
The Indianapolis Bar Association takes aim at the Marion Superior judicial selection process.
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Marion County Small Claims courts take small steps

August 29, 2012
Dave Stafford
Recommended overhauls on the courts' structure are unlikely following the task force's critical report.
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The case against Bei Bei Shuai

August 15, 2012
Dave Stafford
Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry never expected the prosecution of Chinese immigrant Bei Bei Shuai to become a cause célèbre. It also has become a battleground over prosecutorial discretion and how far a defense attorney can go in representing her client.
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JQC files charge against St. Joseph Judge Peter Nemeth

August 14, 2012
IL Staff
St. Joseph Probate Judge Peter Nemeth’s comments in denying an interpreter for an 18-year-old deaf person who was the subject of a guardianship proceeding have resulted in disciplinary charges filed by the Indiana Judicial Qualifications Commission.
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Ruling for IBM likely first act in legal epic

August 1, 2012
Dave Stafford
A ruling that ordered the state to pay more than $52 million to IBM due to cancellation of its contract to privatize social service claims processing certainly will have a second, and most likely a third, act.
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Indianapolis attorney facing fraud charges released from jail

July 31, 2012
Scott Olson
Lawyer William F. Conour had been held in a Decatur County Jail since July 25 on a contempt of court charge until a judge on Monday ordered his release. Conour is accused of defrauding clients of $2.5 million.
 
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State will appeal IBM ruling

July 18, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The state is going to appeal Wednesday’s decision in Marion Superior Court that it pay IBM $52 million for ending early its billion-dollar contract with the company to update the state’s welfare system.
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State must pay $52M over terminated welfare contract

July 18, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
Marion Superior Judge David Dreyer has ordered the state to pay IBM an additional $12 million in early termination closeout payments and for equipment it retained after canceling a contract with IBM to implement a modernized welfare system. The judge previously ruled in January that the state was on the hook for $40 million in subcontractor assignment fees for terminating the contract.
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Appeals court upholds rape conviction

July 13, 2012
Dave Stafford
A man convicted of rape based on DNA evidence and his admission that he had sex with the victim failed to prove to the Indiana Court of Appeals that he was denied a fair trial due to the admission of hearsay testimony and a sustained objection to an attempt to refresh the victim’s memory.
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BrightPoint settles 2 suits against rival Brightstar

July 13, 2012
Scott Olson
Indianapolis-based BrightPoint Inc. has agreed to settle two lawsuits it brought against similarly named rival Brightstar Corp.
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Lake County local rule requires e-filing of certain cases, fee increase implemented

July 11, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
Beginning July 16, all civil collection, civil tort, civil plenary and miscellaneous cases filed in the County Division Courts Room 2 or 3 in Lake County will have to be filed electronically using the county’s new e-filing system. The change is a result of an amendment to Local Rule 45-A.R.16-17.
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Hauke receiver files suit against his former accounting firm

July 9, 2012
Scott Olson
The receiver representing investors in the Ponzi scheme run by convicted money manager Keenan Hauke has sued Hauke's former accounting firm, charging that its negligence contributed to millions of dollars in investor losses.
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Pilot project will introduce video transcripts in 3 courts

July 4, 2012
Dave Stafford
Three Indiana courts are weeks away from beginning an unprecedented experiment: recording proceedings with digital video that will form the official trial court record.
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Indiana justices outline ‘improvement to real property’

June 25, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
For the first time, the Indiana Supreme Court addressed what constitutes an “improvement to real property” as mentioned in the construction statute of repose. In doing so, the justices reversed the trial court’s grant of a contractor’s motion for summary judgment in a wrongful death claim.
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Disgraced 'Nose Doctor' keeping lawyers busy

June 20, 2012
Dave Stafford
Dr. Mark Weinberger's silence on 350 medical malpractice claims is providing unique experience for Indiana law firms.
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Dressing defendants

May 23, 2012
Jenny Montgomery
Attorneys say image and attire may influence jurors.
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Indianapolis attorney charged with defrauding clients out of $2.5M

April 27, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
An Indianapolis attorney has been charged with misappropriating more than $2 million from his clients.
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Justices deny case involving trial judges issuing orders against other courts

April 24, 2012
IL Staff
The Indiana Supreme Court will not take the lawsuit filed by six people against Marion Superior Judge William Young for his actions in traffic court. The plaintiffs wanted the special judge appointed to their case to order Young to comply with certain procedures, which included mandating Young allow the general public to attend court sessions.
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IndyBar releases results of judicial candidate peer evaluation

April 23, 2012
Jennifer Nelson
The Indianapolis Bar Association’s Judicial Excellence Political Action Committee released the results of its 2012 judicial candidate evaluation. The Democratic and Republican Party ballots will feature twelve candidates vying for 10 spots on Marion Superior Court. The candidates received varied approval rates, from just 18 percent to nearly 97 percent.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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