Indiana Trial Courts

E-filing mandatory in Franklin, Rush, Union counties Sept. 30

August 1, 2016
IL Staff
E-filing is now available in courts in Franklin, Rush and Union counties and will be mandatory in these courts beginning Sept. 30.
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Plaintiffs lose state court challenge to anti-conflict of interest law

July 28, 2016
IL Staff
The five northern Indiana police officers or firefighters who challenged a state law that would prohibit them from simultaneously also serving in elected office had their suit challenging the 2013 law dismissed Tuesday.
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Prosecutor to seek death penalty in Indy ‘Purge’ killings

July 26, 2016
 Associated Press
Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry said Tuesday he will seek the death penalty in the case of a 19-year-old Indianapolis man charged with fatally shooting three people over four days in May.
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Boyfriend gets 55 years for killing woman as kids watched

July 26, 2016
 Associated Press
A judge has sentenced a northern Indiana man to 55 years in prison for fatally shooting his girlfriend as her three children watched.
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Judge gives Richmond man 76 years for kidnapping wife

July 12, 2016
 Associated Press
A Richmond man has been sentenced to 76 years in prison for kidnapping his estranged wife two years ago.
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Pilot program to help judges with complex motions

June 29, 2016
Scott Roberts
Judges in four Indiana counties soon will have some help with complex motions thanks to a bill passed by the Indiana Legislature.
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Pit bull owner sentenced to jail for mauling of 2 women

June 28, 2016
 Associated Press
A northern Indiana man has been sentenced to four years in jail after his pit bulls mauled two women during a walk.
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Study: Indiana judiciary doesn’t reflect state’s diversity

June 22, 2016
Scott Roberts
Indiana is one of 26 states to receive a failing grade on the diversity of its judiciary in a new study released Wednesday by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy.
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Judge’s actions move IBM case back to Supreme Court

June 1, 2016
Dave Stafford
There appears to be no end in sight to the ‘extraordinary’ canceled welfare contract lawsuit involving the state and IBM.
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Judge faces Supreme Court removal petition in State v. IBM case

May 24, 2016
Dave Stafford
Petitions filed Monday with the Indiana Supreme Court argue a Marion County judge defied a Supreme Court order and overstepped his authority in ruling on remand that the state could prove no damages from its canceled $1.3 billion welfare-privatization contract with IBM.
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Ex-attorney from Richmond avoids jail for bilking clients

May 20, 2016
 Associated Press
A former Richmond attorney will not spend any time in jail despite pleading guilty to eight felony theft charges of taking money from clients but never filing their bankruptcy petitions.
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Man loses home damage appeal that blamed neighbor’s watering

May 20, 2016
Dave Stafford
A man whose Monroe County home was lost to mold contamination lost his appeal of a jury verdict in favor of his neighbor. The homeowner had claimed his neighbor's excessive watering of her lawn caused water damage to the basement of his home.
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Vanderburgh work release program takes on new direction

May 16, 2016
 Associated Press

Since July 2015 the Vanderburgh County work release program has undergone a metamorphosis under a cooperative agreement between the sheriff's office and the county's treatment courts. That is when Superior Judge Wayne Trockman and Circuit Court Judge David Kiely took over daily operations and rechristened it Therapeutic Work Release to reflect its new focus on rehabilitation.

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Judge may decide to delay trial in IU student's death

May 9, 2016
 Associated Press
A judge may decide this week whether to delay the trial of a Bloomington man accused of killing an Indiana University student.
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Appellate pleadings and motions going online pushed to July 1

May 9, 2016
Scott Roberts
In its third meeting, the Advisory Task Force on Remote Access to and Privacy of Electronic Court Records shifted discussion to what types of trial court cases should be made available online at mycase.in.gov and any potential issues in doing so.
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St. Joe Circuit judge named as new federal magistrate

April 27, 2016
IL Staff
St. Joseph Circuit Judge Michael G. Gotsch is moving from one court to another this year. The judge, who decided not to run for re-election, has been selected to serve as a magistrate judge in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Indiana.
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Judge seals records in case of 1-year-old’s murder

April 8, 2016
 Associated Press
A judge in Spencer presiding over the case of a man accused of abducting and killing a 1-year-old girl has ordered certain records sealed.
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Motor vehicle accident: Noblesville collision

April 6, 2016
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Pilot evaluating people for pretrial release nears start

April 6, 2016
Marilyn Odendahl
Some Indiana trial courts plan to utilize a risk assessment tool to identify who can be discharged without posting bail.
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Launch of Marion County online transcript service delayed

April 4, 2016
Scott Roberts
The Marion Circuit and Superior Courts have postponed implementation of TheRecordXchange, an Internet-based transcript ordering and production management platform.
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Indianapolis house blast convict says informant set him up

April 1, 2016
 Associated Press
An Indianapolis man convicted on 53 counts in a house explosion that killed two people and devastated the southside Richmond Hill neighborhood said testimony from a jailhouse informant and undercover officer saying he tried to have a key witness killed never should have been presented at his trial.
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Jury convicts 7th person in fatal shooting of South Bend boy

April 1, 2016
 Associated Press
Jurors have convicted a seventh person of involvement with gunfire during a gang fight that resulted in a South Bend toddler being fatally wounded by a stray bullet.
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ADA claims against St. Joseph County courts fail in 7th Circuit

March 24, 2016
Scott Roberts
The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld summary judgment for the St. Joseph County court system in a case involving accessibility of the St. Joseph County Courthouse and the Mishawaka County Services Building. The court said many of the plaintiffs’ claims lack standing, while others failed to raise genuine disputes of material fact.
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Pipe bomb targets judge’s home in southeastern Indiana

March 18, 2016
 Associated Press
Police say a second pipe bomb in less than two weeks has exploded in the southeastern Indiana city of Madison, and they think the criminal justice system is being targeted.
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Lawmakers punt Marion County judge-selection bill to next year

March 11, 2016
Hayleigh Colombo, Indianapolis Business Journal
Indiana lawmakers were unable to come to an agreement on how to select Marion County Superior Court judges by the end of the legislative session on Thursday night and punted the decision until next year.
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  1. The appellate court just said doctors can be sued for reporting child abuse. The most dangerous form of child abuse with the highest mortality rate of any form of child abuse (between 6% and 9% according to the below listed studies). Now doctors will be far less likely to report this form of dangerous child abuse in Indiana. If you want to know what this is, google the names Lacey Spears, Julie Conley (and look at what happened when uninformed judges returned that child against medical advice), Hope Ybarra, and Dixie Blanchard. Here is some really good reporting on what this allegation was: http://media.star-telegram.com/Munchausenmoms/ Here are the two research papers: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0145213487900810 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0145213403000309 25% of sibling are dead in that second study. 25%!!! Unbelievable ruling. Chilling. Wrong.

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  3. Mr. Levin says that the BMV engaged in misconduct--that the BMV (or, rather, someone in the BMV) knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged fees but did nothing to correct the situation. Such misconduct, whether engaged in by one individual or by a group, is called theft (defined as knowingly or intentionally exerting unauthorized control over the property of another person with the intent to deprive the other person of the property's value or use). Theft is a crime in Indiana (as it still is in most of the civilized world). One wonders, then, why there have been no criminal prosecutions of BMV officials for this theft? Government misconduct doesn't occur in a vacuum. An individual who works for or oversees a government agency is responsible for the misconduct. In this instance, somebody (or somebodies) with the BMV, at some time, knew Indiana motorists were being overcharged. What's more, this person (or these people), even after having the error of their ways pointed out to them, did nothing to fix the problem. Instead, the overcharges continued. Thus, the taxpayers of Indiana are also on the hook for the millions of dollars in attorneys fees (for both sides; the BMV didn't see fit to avail itself of the services of a lawyer employed by the state government) that had to be spent in order to finally convince the BMV that stealing money from Indiana motorists was a bad thing. Given that the BMV official(s) responsible for this crime continued their misconduct, covered it up, and never did anything until the agency reached an agreeable settlement, it seems the statute of limitations for prosecuting these folks has not yet run. I hope our Attorney General is paying attention to this fiasco and is seriously considering prosecution. Indiana, the state that works . . . for thieves.

  4. I'm glad that attorney Carl Hayes, who represented the BMV in this case, is able to say that his client "is pleased to have resolved the issue". Everyone makes mistakes, even bureaucratic behemoths like Indiana's BMV. So to some extent we need to be forgiving of such mistakes. But when those mistakes are going to cost Indiana taxpayers millions of dollars to rectify (because neither plaintiff's counsel nor Mr. Hayes gave freely of their services, and the BMV, being a state-funded agency, relies on taxpayer dollars to pay these attorneys their fees), the agency doesn't have a right to feel "pleased to have resolved the issue". One is left wondering why the BMV feels so pleased with this resolution? The magnitude of the agency's overcharges might suggest to some that, perhaps, these errors were more than mere oversight. Could this be why the agency is so "pleased" with this resolution? Will Indiana motorists ever be assured that the culture of incompetence (if not worse) that the BMV seems to have fostered is no longer the status quo? Or will even more "overcharges" and lawsuits result? It's fairly obvious who is really "pleased to have resolved the issue", and it's not Indiana's taxpayers who are on the hook for the legal fees generated in these cases.

  5. From the article's fourth paragraph: "Her work underscores the blurry lines in Russia between the government and businesses . . ." Obviously, the author of this piece doesn't pay much attention to the "blurry lines" between government and businesses that exist in the United States. And I'm not talking only about Trump's alleged conflicts of interest. When lobbyists for major industries (pharmaceutical, petroleum, insurance, etc) have greater access to this country's elected representatives than do everyday individuals (i.e., voters), then I would say that the lines between government and business in the United States are just as blurry, if not more so, than in Russia.

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