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Indianapolis legal community saddened by death of beloved priest

Marilyn Odendahl
March 3, 2014
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The Rev. Thomas Murphy, a member of the Indianapolis legal community who left the practice of law to become a priest, died Friday after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease.

He was 82.

“He was a dear, dear friend,” said Nancy Gargula, U.S. Trustee for Region 10 and Region 13. “He embraced everyone of all faiths and he nurtured everyone to make the most of every day and give back.”

Murphy graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1954 and the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law in 1961. He practiced law for 19 years at Hilgedag Johnson Secrest and Murphy in Indianapolis.
 
He entered politics, serving one term in the Indiana House of Representatives in 1965-1966 and running in the Democratic primary for Indiana Attorney in 1968.

Murphy was studying for the priesthood when Gargula began practicing as a young lawyer. They met at the Notre Dame Club of Indianapolis, where Murphy served as chaplain for several years, and developed a friendship over their common love for music.

He was an accomplished pianist and organist who played regularly at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church in Indianapolis and once for Pope John Paul II at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

Murphy persuaded Gargula to cantor for the Sunday evening Mass at his parish, St. Joan of Arc. Prior to the service, the two would often sit in the small outdoor garden and talk. Gargula remembered Murphy being especially supportive during a time when her daughter was having difficulties.

Ordained in 1985, Murphy served at St. Lawrence and Christ the King parishes as well as at St. Joan of Arc and St. John the Evangelist. His work as the archdiocesan representative in the Ecumenical and Interfaith areas made him known well beyond the legal and Catholic communities.

Even after he became a priest, he maintained his ties to the law. He was a member of the Indianapolis and Indiana State bar associations and always attended the annual Red Mass. Members of the St. Thomas More Society recognized Murphy with the Man for All Seasons award, the highest honor the society can give recognizing character, courage and conviction.

Gargula said Murphy had a gift for instantly connecting with everyone he met and making friends easily.

Murphy’s ability to cultivate friendships impressed Patrick Olmstead, Greenwood attorney and president of the St. Thomas More Society of Indianapolis. Olmstead said whenever he spoke with Murphy, the priest would make him feel like the most important person in the room.

As his disease progressed, Murphy lost his ability to play the piano, became confined to a wheelchair, and struggled to speak. Olmstead remembered that through the hardships, Murphy was never bitter nor did he ever complain. He kept his dignity, remained humble and truly enjoyed being around other people.  

“He was a real special guy,” Olmstead said.

A Mass celebrating Murphy’s life will begin at 11 a.m. March 7 at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, 5333 E. Washington St., in Indianapolis. Visitation will be held at St. John the Evangelist Church from 3 to 8 p.m. March 6, and for one hour prior to the funeral Mass at Our Lady of Lourdes.


 

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  1. Ah yes... Echoes of 1963 as a ghostly George Wallace makes his stand at the Schoolhouse door. We now know about the stand of personal belief over service to all constituents at the Carter County Clerk door. The results are the same, bigotry unable to follow the directions of the courts and the courts win. Interesting to watch the personal belief take a back seat rather than resign from a perception of local power to make the statement.

  2. An oath of office, does it override the conscience? That is the defense of overall soldier who violates higher laws, isnt it? "I was just following orders" and "I swore an oath of loyalty to der Fuhrer" etc. So this is an interesting case of swearing a false oath and then knowing that it was wrong and doing the right thing. Maybe they should chop her head off too like the "king's good servant-- but God's first" like St Thomas More. ...... We wont hold our breath waiting for the aclu or other "civil liberterians" to come to her defense since they are all arrayed on the gay side, to a man or should I say to a man and womyn?

  3. Perhaps we should also convene a panel of independent anthropological experts to study the issues surrounding this little-known branch of human sacrifice?

  4. I'm going to court the beginning of Oct. 2015 to establish visitation and request my daughters visits while she is in jail. I raised my grandchild for the first two and half years. She was born out of wedlock and the father and his adopted mother wantwd her aborted, they went as far as sueing my daughter for abortion money back 5mo. After my grandchild was born. Now because of depression and drug abuse my daughter lost custody 2 and a half years ago. Everyting went wrong in court when i went for custody my lawyer was thrown out and a replacment could only stay 45 min. The judge would not allow a postponement. So the father won. Now he is aleinating me and my daughter. No matter the amount of time spent getting help for my daughter and her doing better he runs her in the ground to the point of suicide because he wants her to be in a relationship with him. It is a sick game of using my grandchild as a pawn to make my daughter suffer for not wanting to be with him. I became the intervener in the case when my daughter first got into trouble. Because of this they gave me her visitation. Im hoping to get it again there is questions of abuse on his part and I want to make sure my grandchild is doing alright. I really dont understand how the parents have rights to walk in and do whatever they want when the refuse to stand up and raise the child at first . Why should it take two and a half years to decide you want to raise your child.The father used me so he could finish college get a job and stop paying support by getting custody. Support he was paying my daughter that I never saw.

  5. Pence said when he ordered the investigation that Indiana residents should be troubled by the allegations after the video went viral. Planned Parenthood has asked the government s top health scientists at the National Institutes of Health to convene a panel of independent experts to study the issues surrounding the little-known branch of medicine.

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