ILNews

Indianapolis loses attorney and civic leader Edgar Lamb

IL Staff
August 5, 2013
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An attorney who played an integral role in consolidating the governments of the city of Indianapolis and Marion County, which made the Hoosier state capital the 11th largest city in the United States, has died.

Edgar H. Lamb passed away July 27, 2013, at his Indianapolis home. He was 78.

“He could talk to anybody and he could listen to anybody,” said Paul Ludwig of Redman and Ludwig PC. “He was a great listener with his clients, he kept an open mind when he listened to them.”

Lamb built a distinguished law career after graduating from Indiana University School of Law. He served as public defender for the Marion County Criminal Court in 1967 before being appointed by former mayors Richard Lugar and William Hudnut as Indianapolis city prosecutor from 1968 through 1975.

Also, he served as a key player in the establishment of Unigov, the term for the combined city-county government in 1969.

Lamb spent the majority of his career in private practice where he represented individuals and publicly traded as well as privately held businesses in civil matters. He was an attorney at Yarling Robinson Hammel & Lamb and, later, entered solo practice.

Ludwig was Lamb’s associate in the early 1980s at the Yarling, Robinson firm. Lamb had expectations and the initiative and self-reliance of a fight pilot, but Ludwig also remembered him as being gracious and never raising his voice.

“His clients just loved him,” Ludwig said. “Nobody had anything bad to say against Ed.”

Working for Lamb, Ludwig was exposed to an array of colorful clients and had many opportunities to see different things. Ludwig also learned a few “old-school lawyering” techniques.

“It was intriguing almost everyday,” Ludwig said.

After nearly 50 years in practice, Lamb retired in 2013.

Prior to going to college, Lamb served in the U.S. Military. He graduated from U.S. Air Force training in 1956 as a 2nd lieutenant with the aeronautical rating of pilot. He then became a fighter pilot and at the age of 22 and exceeded the speed of sound in the F-86 Sabre Jet.

He served as a member of the Indiana National Guard from Hulman Field in Terre Haute. In 1961, he was recalled to active duty for 12 months during the Berlin Crisis. At that time, he was honored with the State of Indiana National Emergency Service Medal Award.

A lifelong Republican, Lamb was active in civic affairs for many years.

Lamb is survived by his wife Barbara and three children, Eric (Jackie) Lamb, Kristin (Michael) Marlowe and Jonathan Lamb. His three children all followed his lead into the practice of law.

A funeral was held Aug. 1 at Pilgrim Lutheran Church, Carmel, followed by interment in Pleasant Hill Cemetery.

    
 

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  1. I gave tempparry guardship to a friend of my granddaughter in 2012. I went to prison. I had custody. My daughter went to prison to. We are out. My daughter gave me custody but can get her back. She was not order to give me custody . but now we want granddaughter back from friend. She's 14 now. What rights do we have

  2. This sure is not what most who value good governance consider the Rule of Law to entail: "In a letter dated March 2, which Brizzi forwarded to IBJ, the commission dismissed the grievance “on grounds that there is not reasonable cause to believe that you are guilty of misconduct.”" Yet two month later reasonable cause does exist? (Or is the commission forging ahead, the need for reasonable belief be damned? -- A seeming violation of the Rules of Profession Ethics on the part of the commission) Could the rule of law theory cause one to believe that an explanation is in order? Could it be that Hoosier attorneys live under Imperial Law (which is also a t-word that rhymes with infamy) in which the Platonic guardians can do no wrong and never owe the plebeian class any explanation for their powerful actions. (Might makes it right?) Could this be a case of politics directing the commission, as celebrated IU Mauer Professor (the late) Patrick Baude warned was happening 20 years ago in his controversial (whisteblowing) ethics lecture on a quite similar topic: http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1498&context=ilj

  3. I have a case presently pending cert review before the SCOTUS that reveals just how Indiana regulates the bar. I have been denied licensure for life for holding the wrong views and questioning the grand inquisitors as to their duties as to state and federal constitutional due process. True story: https://www.scribd.com/doc/299040839/2016Petitionforcert-to-SCOTUS Shorter, Amici brief serving to frame issue as misuse of govt licensure: https://www.scribd.com/doc/312841269/Thomas-More-Society-Amicus-Brown-v-Ind-Bd-of-Law-Examiners

  4. Here's an idea...how about we MORE heavily regulate the law schools to reduce the surplus of graduates, driving starting salaries up for those new grads, so that we can all pay our insane amount of student loans off in a reasonable amount of time and then be able to afford to do pro bono & low-fee work? I've got friends in other industries, radiology for example, and their schools accept a very limited number of students so there will never be a glut of new grads and everyone's pay stays high. For example, my radiologist friend's school accepted just six new students per year.

  5. I totally agree with John Smith.

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