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IndyBar: Participating in the IndyBar Diversity Job Fair

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By Roxana Bell, Bingham Greenebaum Doll LLP

Upon saying goodbye to Judge Jane Magnus-Stinson after a two-year clerkship in her chambers, I handed her a framed clipping from the Aug. 1, 2012, issue of The Indiana Lawyer, which featured a photo of the two of us at the 2012 IndyBar Diversity Job Fair. The article holds special significance to me because I count the two summers we spent interviewing candidates together at the Job Fair among my fondest memories with her.
 

iba-p1017003-15col.jpg Attendees enjoy conversation and lunch together at the Diversity & the Law Luncheon, held in conjunction with the 2013 IndyBar Diversity Job Fair.

Since 2008, the IndyBar Diversity Job Fair has forged a tradition of fostering diversity and inclusion within the Indianapolis legal community. As a student-participant in 2010, I interviewed with seven employers, including Bingham Greenebaum Doll (then Bingham McHale), where I am now an associate, and the Office of the Indiana Attorney General, where I ultimately spent my 2L summer. I can remember each of those interviews well, not because of anything that was spoken, but because of the unspoken message those employers conveyed simply by participating in the Job Fairs. You are welcome here. We want to work alongside you. You would fit well with us. We are looking for someone like you.

Now, as a practitioner, when I reflect on my past experiences with the IndyBar Diversity Job Fair, it is clear to me where its greatest force lies: with the judges, law firms, and public agencies that demonstrate their support of diversity and inclusion by participating as interviewers, and the lasting impression they leave in the minds and hearts of those they take the time to meet.

If you have had the pleasure of participating in this event as a student, as an employer conducting interviews, as a sponsor, or event guest, I hope you will continue to show your support of diversity by participating again.  If you have not been a past participant, I encourage you to consider doing so this year in whatever capacity you may be able. You will meet talented students from an array of backgrounds who are eager to make Indianapolis their home community. You may even hire one of them (now, or in the future, like my experience with BGD) and gain a valuable asset for your firm or organization. However you choose to participate, your presence will signal your support for a diverse Indianapolis legal community and send a welcoming message to up-and-coming lawyers from all walks of life.

For more information about the 2014 IndyBar Diversity Job Fair, which will be held Aug. 21 and 22, 2014, please visit www.ibadiversityjobfair.org. I hope to see you there!

Ms. Bell is an Associate at Bingham Greenebaum Doll where she practices in the Labor and Employment Group. Before joining Bingham Greenebaum Doll, Roxana clerked for Judge Jane Magnus-Stinson of the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana, and Judge Rudolph Pyle III of the Court of Appeals of Indiana. She is a member of the IndyBar Diversity Job Fair Committee.

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  1. Video pen? Nice work, "JW"! Let this be a lesson and a caution to all disgruntled ex-spouses (or soon-to-be ex-spouses) . . . you may think that altercation is going to get you some satisfaction . . . it will not.

  2. First comment on this thread is a fitting final comment on this thread, as that the MCBA never answered Duncan's fine question, and now even Eric Holder agrees that the MCBA was in material error as to the facts: "I don't get it" from Duncan December 1, 2014 5:10 PM "The Grand Jury met for 25 days and heard 70 hours of testimony according to this article and they made a decision that no crime occurred. On what basis does the MCBA conclude that their decision was "unjust"? What special knowledge or evidence does the MCBA have that the Grand Jury hearing this matter was unaware of? The system that we as lawyers are sworn to uphold made a decision that there was insufficient proof that officer committed a crime. How can any of us say we know better what was right than the jury that actually heard all of the the evidence in this case."

  3. wow is this a bunch of bs! i know the facts!

  4. MCBA .... time for a new release about your entire membership (or is it just the alter ego) being "saddened and disappointed" in the failure to lynch a police officer protecting himself in the line of duty. But this time against Eric Holder and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: "WASHINGTON — Justice Department lawyers will recommend that no civil rights charges be brought against the police officer who fatally shot an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Mo., after an F.B.I. investigation found no evidence to support charges, law enforcement officials said Wednesday." http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/22/us/justice-department-ferguson-civil-rights-darren-wilson.html?ref=us&_r=0

  5. Dr wail asfour lives 3 hours from the hospital,where if he gets an emergency at least he needs three hours,while even if he is on call he should be in a location where it gives him max 10 minutes to be beside the patient,they get paid double on their on call days ,where look how they handle it,so if the death of the patient occurs on weekend and these doctors still repeat same pattern such issue should be raised,they should be closer to the patient.on other hand if all the death occured on the absence of the Dr and the nurses handle it,the nurses should get trained how to function appearntly they not that good,if the Dr lives 3 hours far from the hospital on his call days he should sleep in the hospital

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