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Editorial: IndyBar - Your Source for Information

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By Julie Armstrong, Executive Director

Back in the day, even before I joined the IndyBar staff, there was a singular method for communicating with our members. Known as the Bulletin, it was a printed elongated postcard readily identified for its unique size and concise information. It was the most recognizable and convenient way to know what was going on at the Bar.

Over time growth in IndyBar programs and services and the development of new technology made it beneficial to utilize a variety of other communication tools. Some of those resources include: The Indiana Lawyer, www.indybar.org, print brochures, Facebook, and Twitter. The focus of each of these new tools is essentially the same as the old Bulletin – what’s happening at the IndyBar. Today we’re adding yet another tool for providing information by launching the IndyBar blog at www.indybar.org.

For those unfamiliar with blogs they’re essentially an online diary of thoughts and information for open sharing with those taking the time to read to the blog. The IndyBar’s blog is intended to share news of new laws, post articles of common interest, and comment on information unique to our legal community. Don’t want to have the headache of remembering to check the blog? No problem. Follow Indybar on Twitter. The daily blog posting will be tweeted so you can determine at a glance if there’s information of interest.

Consider our blog as a quick, yet useful glance in your day. Rarely will the posting extend beyond two paragraphs. If you find yourself still reading it will be because you found the links we may provide to be useful.

You’re also encouraged to provide information for the blog. Your help in suggesting blogs for linking to our own is also appreciated. The more information provided the better.

What we don’t want to do with the blog is become narrow in our focus, political in our nature or stale in our content. It’s a diary of ideas and information which we hope will promote thought and additional personal research.

Schedule a moment to check out the blog. It won’t hurt, and it might help. Who knows, you might even find your name in a posting.•

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  1. Your article is a good intro the recent amendments to Fed.R.Civ.P. For a much longer - though not necessarily better -- summary, counsel might want to read THE CHIEF UMPIRE IS CHANGING THE STRIKE ZONE, which I co-authored and which was just published in the January issue of THE VERDICT (the monthly publication of the Indiana Trial Lawyers Association).

  2. Thank you, John Smith, for pointing out a needed correction. The article has been revised.

  3. The "National institute for Justice" is an agency for the Dept of Justice. That is not the law firm you are talking about in this article. The "institute for justice" is a public interest law firm. http://ij.org/ thanks for interesting article however

  4. I would like to try to find a lawyer as soon possible I've had my money stolen off of my bank card driver pressed charges and I try to get the information they need it and a Social Security board is just give me a hold up a run around for no reason and now it think it might be too late cuz its been over a year I believe and I can't get the right information they need because they keep giving me the runaroundwhat should I do about that

  5. It is wonderful that Indiana DOC is making some truly admirable and positive changes. People with serious mental illness, intellectual disability or developmental disability will benefit from these changes. It will be much better if people can get some help and resources that promote their health and growth than if they suffer alone. If people experience positive growth or healing of their health issues, they may be less likely to do the things that caused them to come to prison in the first place. This will be of benefit for everyone. I am also so happy that Indiana DOC added correctional personnel and mental health staffing. These are tough issues to work with. There should be adequate staffing in prisons so correctional officers and other staff are able to do the kind of work they really want to do-helping people grow and change-rather than just trying to manage chaos. Correctional officers and other staff deserve this. It would be great to see increased mental health services and services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities in the community so that fewer people will have to receive help and support in prisons. Community services would like be less expensive, inherently less demeaning and just a whole lot better for everyone.

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