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Column: Innovative trial techniques on a shoestring budget

Editorial Indiana
November 23, 2011
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Tensions are high and sleep levels are low. Preparing for an upcoming trial often causes anxiety at every level within a firm. While most would like to prepare things more efficiently, it often seems that purchasing the “right” software would simply be too costly. The truth is most firms already possess many of the “right tools” and are merely underutilizing them, while other tools are easily attainable. Below are several common trial preparation tasks and affordable solutions to complete them in a more efficient and effective manner.

deanna finney Finney

The need to convert files to PDF format is very common these days. While many people are aware of the ability to scan to PDF, some do not recognize that electronic files can simply be converted to PDF without expensive software. In fact, users that have Microsoft Office 2007 or 2010 have a “Save to PDF” feature built in to the “Save As” options within all of their Office programs. With a document open, users can simply choose the “Save As” function and select “PDF” from the “file type” drop-down as well as the name and location to which they would like to save the PDF file. Another great option is CutePDF Writer (www.cutepdf.com), a free tool that allows you to “print” any file to a PDF format. Once installed, this tool will appear in the list of available printers. To convert a file to PDF, simply open the file or webpage and choose print. Next, select the “Cute PDF” printer and when prompted, enter the name and location to save the newly created PDF file.

Document markups can be painstakingly monotonous, including tasks such as bates stamping pages, redacting information and highlighting key points. While some people try to finagle their way through these tasks using things like whiteout, Post-it notes and a scanner, there is a much more efficient way that is cost effective, too. Many files are already in PDF format which makes editing the PDF an obvious choice. However, with the full version of Adobe Professional retailing for roughly $450 per license, it is not always a feasible solution for every firm. A great alternative that is a fraction of the price is CutePDF Professional (www.cutepdf.com). This tool allows users to delete and reorder pages, crop and rotate pages, combine multiple documents into a single PDF and quickly insert headers and footers including bates numbers. Redacting, highlighting and additional markup tools including a “typewriter” function are also available and easy to utilize. CutePDF Professional also allows users to easily convert PDF files to image files such as JPEG or TIFF.

Staying organized can be a challenge, especially in document intensive cases. While there are many great tools like Summation and Concordance, many firms choose not to use them due to their high price tag and extensive learning curve. A favorite alternate solution to maintain a hyperlinked exhibit list is Microsoft Excel. Keeping an exhibit list in Excel format allows users to easily sort, filter, keyword search and track lots of information about the documents in a tool that most firms already own. In fact, users can even hyperlink the corresponding document(s) on the list to easily click and open documents on demand. Excel hyperlinking is as easy as 1-2-3: 1. Select the cell to hyperlink. 2. Right click and select hyperlink. 3. Browse out and select the corresponding document. Voila! Now, the selected cell will appear with bright blue font and upon clicking, the corresponding document will automatically open.

The continual need to share information with co-counsel, expert witnesses and others can quickly become costly when CDs, DVDs and shipping are involved. Sharing files electronically has historically not been an option for many due to additional administration of remote servers and expensive software like Citrix. Some fear using online file sharing programs like Dropbox due to the bad publicity surrounding its security protocols and questions of data ownership. There is a secure and affordable alternative available at www.yousendit.com. YouSendIt implements a seven-layer security strategy to keep data safe and secure in addition to making it clear that they will “not claim any ownership rights in any User Files.” Even better, YouSendIt is a primarily free program with a paid option for users wanting to store or send more than 2GB of data at once. With YouSendIt, users can quickly upload and send documents that are too large to email or set up shared folders and make content available to others whom they invite.

It is often difficult to implement new solutions during the heat of trial preparation, so plan ahead and explore these solutions in advance. Small investments like these can greatly reduce the enormous expense of inefficiencies.•

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Deanna Finney (deanna.finney@miscindiana.com) is a co-owner of the Indianapolis-based legal technology company, Modern Information Solutions LLC. Areas of service include traditional IT services, software training and litigation support including trial presentation services. The opinions expressed are those of the author.

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  • Positive Solutions
    I highly recommend Deanna and her team of professionals that serve the legal community. Great information and many thanks for sharing.

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  1. On a related note, I offered the ICLU my cases against the BLE repeatedly, and sought their amici aid repeatedly as well. Crickets. Usually not even a response. I am guessing they do not do allegations of anti-Christian bias? No matter how glaring? I have posted on other links the amicus brief that did get filed (search this ezine, e.g., Kansas attorney), read the Thomas More Society brief to note what the ACLU ran from like vampires from garlic. An Examiner pledged to advance diversity and inclusion came right out on the record and demanded that I choose Man's law or God's law. I wonder, had I been asked to swear off Allah ... what result then, ICLU? Had I been found of bad character and fitness for advocating sexual deviance, what result then ICLU? Had I been lifetime banned for posting left of center statements denigrating the US Constitution, what result ICLU? Hey, we all know don't we? Rather Biased.

  2. It was mentioned in the article that there have been numerous CLE events to train attorneys on e-filing. I would like someone to provide a list of those events, because I have not seen any such events in east central Indiana, and since Hamilton County is one of the counties where e-filing is mandatory, one would expect some instruction in this area. Come on, people, give some instruction, not just applause!

  3. This law is troubling in two respects: First, why wasn't the law reviewed "with the intention of getting all the facts surrounding the legislation and its actual impact on the marketplace" BEFORE it was passed and signed? Seems a bit backwards to me (even acknowledging that this is the Indiana state legislature we're talking about. Second, what is it with the laws in this state that seem to create artificial monopolies in various industries? Besides this one, the other law that comes to mind is the legislation that governed the granting of licenses to firms that wanted to set up craft distilleries. The licensing was limited to only those entities that were already in the craft beer brewing business. Republicans in this state talk a big game when it comes to being "business friendly". They're friendly alright . . . to certain businesses.

  4. Gretchen, Asia, Roberto, Tonia, Shannon, Cheri, Nicholas, Sondra, Carey, Laura ... my heart breaks for you, reaching out in a forum in which you are ignored by a professional suffering through both compassion fatigue and the love of filthy lucre. Most if not all of you seek a warm blooded Hoosier attorney unafraid to take on the government and plead that government officials have acted unconstitutionally to try to save a family and/or rescue children in need and/or press individual rights against the Leviathan state. I know an attorney from Kansas who has taken such cases across the country, arguing before half of the federal courts of appeal and presenting cases to the US S.Ct. numerous times seeking cert. Unfortunately, due to his zeal for the constitutional rights of peasants and willingness to confront powerful government bureaucrats seemingly violating the same ... he was denied character and fitness certification to join the Indiana bar, even after he was cleared to sit for, and passed, both the bar exam and ethics exam. And was even admitted to the Indiana federal bar! NOW KNOW THIS .... you will face headwinds and difficulties in locating a zealously motivated Hoosier attorney to face off against powerful government agents who violate the constitution, for those who do so tend to end up as marginalized as Paul Odgen, who was driven from the profession. So beware, many are mere expensive lapdogs, the kind of breed who will gladly take a large retainer, but then fail to press against the status quo and powers that be when told to heel to. It is a common belief among some in Indiana that those attorneys who truly fight the power and rigorously confront corruption often end up, actually or metaphorically, in real life or at least as to their careers, as dead as the late, great Gary Welch. All of that said, I wish you the very best in finding a Hoosier attorney with a fighting spirit to press your rights as far as you can, for you do have rights against government actors, no matter what said actors may tell you otherwise. Attorneys outside the elitist camp are often better fighters that those owing the powers that be for their salaries, corner offices and end of year bonuses. So do not be afraid to retain a green horn or unconnected lawyer, many of them are fine men and woman who are yet untainted by the "unique" Hoosier system.

  5. I am not the John below. He is a journalist and talk show host who knows me through my years working in Kansas government. I did no ask John to post the note below ...

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