Insurer's policy breach a case of first impression

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In a case of first impression for state courts, the Indiana Court of Appeals affirmed a jury verdict against an insurance company in a breach of contract case, ruling the insured's failure to repair his building following a fire was the fault of the insurance company.

In Rockford Mutual Insurance Co. v. Terrey E. Pirtle, No. 77A01-0802-CV-94, a dispute arose over Terrey Pirtle's failure to repair or replace a historic building he owned in Terre Haute. He rented it out while restoring it and insured the building through Rockford Mutual. It was damaged in an accidental fire in November 2000.

Pirtle rejected a claim to settle for $80,000 because it wasn't enough to satisfy his mortgage or repair the building; his policy limit under Coverage A was $193,000. Rockford told Pirtle he would only be entitled to payment under the replacement cost coverage once repairs or replacement of the building had been completed. It also offered him nearly $70,000 with the rest of the $193,000 to be paid when the property was repaired.

Pirtle filed suit for breach of contract; Rockford paid him more than $86,000 for the building's actual cash value and moved for summary judgment alleging that was all he was entitled to because the building hadn't been repaired or replaced. In October 2007, a jury found Rockford breached the contract and awarded Pirtle $124,149.55 under the insurance policy and $406,136.58 in consequential damages.

On appeal, Rockford argued the terms of the policy are clear and unambiguous that all Pirtle was entitled to receive from the insurer was the $86,000 because he didn't follow the terms of the policy. But Pirtle was in a no-win situation, wrote Judge Kirsch, and had little choice but to use the funds from Rockford to satisfy the mortgage at a loss to the mortgage holder, which left nothing to start the repairs.

Indiana courts have yet to address the issue of whether an insured could be excused from performance of a condition precedent contained in a fire insurance policy. Using cases from the Court of Appeals of Michigan and the District Court in the Southern District of New York, the appellate court ruled Pirtle was excused from performing the condition precedent because Rockford's actions hindered his performance.

"We acknowledge that other courts, including our own Seventh Circuit, have held that the contract must be strictly construed to require the completion of the repair or replacement before liability under the replacement cost endorsement attaches," wrote Judge Kirsch. "... However, we are convinced that equitable principles win the day in this situation; otherwise, the repair or replacement endorsement paid for by Pirtle would be rendered illusory."

The Court of Appeals also rejected Rockford's argument that its liability should be capped at the policy limits, based on Indiana Insurance Co. v. Plummer, 590 N.E.2d 1085 (Ind. Ct. App. 1992). Rockford's motive for delayed payment is irrelevant, so its good faith argument failed, wrote Judge Kirsch. In addition, the damages awarded to Pirtle flow directly from and are proximately caused by Rockford's failure to pay. The judges also ruled the award was within the scope of the evidence.


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  1. If a class action suit or other manner of retribution is possible, count me in. I have email and voicemail from the man. He colluded with opposing counsel, I am certain. My case was damaged so severely it nearly lost me everything and I am still paying dearly.

  2. There's probably a lot of blame that can be cast around for Indiana Tech's abysmal bar passage rate this last February. The folks who decided that Indiana, a state with roughly 16,000 to 18,000 attorneys, needs a fifth law school need to question the motives that drove their support of this project. Others, who have been "strong supporters" of the law school, should likewise ask themselves why they believe this institution should be supported. Is it because it fills some real need in the state? Or is it, instead, nothing more than a resume builder for those who teach there part-time? And others who make excuses for the students' poor performance, especially those who offer nothing more than conspiracy theories to back up their claims--who are they helping? What evidence do they have to support their posturing? Ultimately, though, like most everything in life, whether one succeeds or fails is entirely within one's own hands. At least one student from Indiana Tech proved this when he/she took and passed the February bar. A second Indiana Tech student proved this when they took the bar in another state and passed. As for the remaining 9 who took the bar and didn't pass (apparently, one of the students successfully appealed his/her original score), it's now up to them (and nobody else) to ensure that they pass on their second attempt. These folks should feel no shame; many currently successful practicing attorneys failed the bar exam on their first try. These same attorneys picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and got back to the rigorous study needed to ensure they would pass on their second go 'round. This is what the Indiana Tech students who didn't pass the first time need to do. Of course, none of this answers such questions as whether Indiana Tech should be accredited by the ABA, whether the school should keep its doors open, or, most importantly, whether it should have even opened its doors in the first place. Those who promoted the idea of a fifth law school in Indiana need to do a lot of soul-searching regarding their decisions. These same people should never be allowed, again, to have a say about the future of legal education in this state or anywhere else. Indiana already has four law schools. That's probably one more than it really needs. But it's more than enough.

  3. This man Steve Hubbard goes on any online post or forum he can find and tries to push his company. He said court reporters would be obsolete a few years ago, yet here we are. How does he have time to search out every single post about court reporters and even spy in private court reporting forums if his company is so successful???? Dude, get a life. And back to what this post was about, I agree that some national firms cause a huge problem.

  4. rensselaer imdiana is doing same thing to children from the judge to attorney and dfs staff they need to be investigated as well

  5. Sex offenders are victims twice, once when they are molested as kids, and again when they repeat the behavior, you never see money spent on helping them do you. That's why this circle continues