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ISBA poll on judicial retention to be e-mailed

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A third of the Indiana Court of Appeals judges face retention this year, but before voters mark their ballots attorneys have a chance to say what they think about the five appellate judges who want to remain on the bench.

The Indiana State Bar Association’s Improvements in the Judicial System Committee is e-mailing its poll to its members. The first poll will go out Friday, with a second being released Sept. 24 and the third being sent Oct. 1.

This is a confidential “yes” or “no” survey of the attorneys throughout Indiana, and the ISBA said results will be released publicly in early October.

This is the second time attorneys will receive the poll by e-mail rather than traditional paper ballots; the first time was in 2008, when three Indiana Supreme Court justices, one Court of Appeals judge, and the Tax Court judge were up for retention. About 8,000 members were polled two years ago, and nearly 1,500 cast ballots, translating to an 18.5 percent response rate, which overwhelmingly supported the jurists.

“Lawyers are uniquely qualified to evaluate members of the judiciary because we work with the judges and follow their actions and decisions all the time,” said Roderick Morgan, ISBA president and a partner at Bingham McHale in Indianapolis. “The anonymous comment section on the ballot provides an opportunity to offer comments and constructive criticism to a judge subject to the retention vote. Those specific comments can help a judge understand exactly what lawyers feel about the judge’s performance.”

Those facing retention this year are:

- Judge L. Mark Bailey: a former Decatur County judge who was appointed to the appellate bench in 1998 and retained in 2000. He represents the First District, which includes southern Indiana.

- Judge Elaine B. Brown: served on the Dubois Superior Court for a total 15 years before Gov. Mitch Daniels appointed her to the appellate bench in May 2008. This is her first retention vote after being initially named to the court, and she represents the Fifth District that includes the entire state.

- Judge Cale J. Bradford: served for more than 10 years as a Marion Superior judge before the governor elevated him to the appellate bench Aug. 1, 2007. He represents the Second District, which includes the central part of the state.

- Judge Melissa S. May: a former 14-year insurance defense and personal injury attorney in Evansville who was appointed to the Court of Appeals in April 1998 and then retained in 2000. She represents the Fourth District that includes the entire state.

- Judge Margret G. Robb: who was appointed to the appeals court in July 1998 by then-Gov. Frank O’Bannon, after 20 years of general practice in Lafayette and service as a bankruptcy trustee for the Northern District of Indiana, as well as service as a mediator and deputy public defender. She serves for the Fifth District that includes the entire state.

Full biographical information about each judge, as well as links to their appellate decisions and general retention election information, is available on the state judiciary’s website at www.courts.IN.gov/retention. The new site went online in June and mirrors the one created in 2008 after Senate President Pro Temp David Long urged the judiciary to provide more information about the retention process to voters.
 

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  1. First comment on this thread is a fitting final comment on this thread, as that the MCBA never answered Duncan's fine question, and now even Eric Holder agrees that the MCBA was in material error as to the facts: "I don't get it" from Duncan December 1, 2014 5:10 PM "The Grand Jury met for 25 days and heard 70 hours of testimony according to this article and they made a decision that no crime occurred. On what basis does the MCBA conclude that their decision was "unjust"? What special knowledge or evidence does the MCBA have that the Grand Jury hearing this matter was unaware of? The system that we as lawyers are sworn to uphold made a decision that there was insufficient proof that officer committed a crime. How can any of us say we know better what was right than the jury that actually heard all of the the evidence in this case."

  2. wow is this a bunch of bs! i know the facts!

  3. MCBA .... time for a new release about your entire membership (or is it just the alter ego) being "saddened and disappointed" in the failure to lynch a police officer protecting himself in the line of duty. But this time against Eric Holder and the Federal Bureau of Investigation: "WASHINGTON — Justice Department lawyers will recommend that no civil rights charges be brought against the police officer who fatally shot an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Mo., after an F.B.I. investigation found no evidence to support charges, law enforcement officials said Wednesday." http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/22/us/justice-department-ferguson-civil-rights-darren-wilson.html?ref=us&_r=0

  4. Dr wail asfour lives 3 hours from the hospital,where if he gets an emergency at least he needs three hours,while even if he is on call he should be in a location where it gives him max 10 minutes to be beside the patient,they get paid double on their on call days ,where look how they handle it,so if the death of the patient occurs on weekend and these doctors still repeat same pattern such issue should be raised,they should be closer to the patient.on other hand if all the death occured on the absence of the Dr and the nurses handle it,the nurses should get trained how to function appearntly they not that good,if the Dr lives 3 hours far from the hospital on his call days he should sleep in the hospital

  5. It's a capital offense...one for you Latin scholars..

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