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ITLA chief seeks bridge between young and veteran lawyers

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Fresh out of high school, Mark Scott landed a job in a law firm. His primary task was to sift through all of the files – dating back to the 1940s – housed in the upstairs storeroom.

“As you can imagine, it wasn’t exactly scintillating work, so I decided I’d read everything. I read everything, and I was just enthralled,” Scott said. “I was just a gopher there, making $4.25 an hour, and I’d spend sometimes a day at a copy machine making copies, pulling vines off a building. I’ve done every job in a law firm, from mopping the floors to running a firm,” he said.

scott Scott

Scott has come a long way since then. In May, the Kokomo personal injury attorney began his tenure as president of the Indiana Trial Lawyers Association.

His agenda

Scott said one of his initiatives as president will be to bridge the gap between the established, veteran members of the ITLA and young lawyers.

“We’ve been really blessed with an active young lawyers section, and obviously young lawyers are our future for the ITLA and for the bar association as a whole, so we want to continue to reach out to young lawyers … and identify those people who are qualified for leadership positions,” he said.

Scott, at age 46, might be the youngest president of ITLA. Micki Wilson, ITLA executive director, said he’s the youngest president since she took the helm in 1978. Scott remembers feeling a bit intimidated in the presence of seasoned lawyers when he was new to the profession, and he thinks veteran lawyers have a lot to offer young attorneys.

“We don’t graduate from law school and become successful trial lawyers; it’s a process that happens over the course of many years, and like everything else, it’s a trial-and-error experience,” he said. “As senior members, we’ve already been down that road; our ability to reach out and help young lawyers avoid some of those pitfalls is critical to their success.”

Another priority for Scott is striving for diversity in the ITLA and becoming a regional go-to source for continuing legal education seminars like the one ITLA hosted last year.

“Last summer, we were the first sponsor of a regional CLE for trial lawyers here in the Midwest and contiguous states,” Scott said. The ITLA worked with other trial lawyers’ associations to bring nationally known trial lawyer and author Rick Friedman to Indiana for a two-day seminar.

Scott also wants to look at the technological infrastructure of the ITLA and make sure that it has the equipment and capabilities to perform tasks efficiently. Along those lines, he’d like to identify ways for the website to be more interactive, allowing for online dues and CLE payment.

Lessons learned

Asked what he has learned from past ITLA presidents, Scott laughed heartily and said, “The goals a president sets for himself at the beginning of his or her term often go quickly awry.”

He explained that any number of unexpected developments can derail plans.

“It is a fluid process, and we don’t know what’s coming down the pike in the General Assembly, a decision from the (Indiana) Court of Appeals or Supreme Court … obviously when a decision like Stanley v. Walker comes down, that has a wide impact on our members and the people we represent,” he said. Scott, who was chair of the ITLA’s Amicus Curiae Committee from 2005 until January 2012, wrote amicus briefs in Stanley v. Walker. In that case, the injured party – Danny Walker – had introduced his original medical bills totaling $11,570, but as a result of negotiations between Walker’s health insurance company and medical insurance providers, the total was reduced by $4,750. While the trial court held that Walker did not have to show the discounted amount, the Indiana Supreme Court remanded for a reduction of Walker’s damages, in the amount of $4,750.

Lonnie Johnson, president of the Defense Trial Counsel of Indiana, sees a promising young leader in Scott.

“ITLA has a long tradition of selecting presidents respected by all members of the bar and dedicated to civility and maintaining the integrity of our shared legal system, and consistent with this tradition, Mark Scott is well known and respected by all members of the bar,” Johnson said.

Scott is an avid fisherman who enjoys writing poetry and playing drums. “I am the poster child for a liberal arts education,” he said.

He earned his law degree at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law after graduating from Wabash College.

Scott said neither of his parents attended college, nor could they afford to send him to Wabash. So he applied for and received a Lilly Scholarship – an award that covers tuition and room and board for four years at Wabash – and this year it is estimated to have a value of $170,000. Because of the opportunities that scholarship created for him, Scott said he has enjoyed helping to review applications for the Lilly award. “It’s a tremendously uplifting experience,” he said.•

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  1. Wishing Mary Willis only God's best, and superhuman strength, as she attempts to right a ship that too often strays far off course. May she never suffer this personal affect, as some do who attempt to change a broken system: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QojajMsd2nE

  2. Indiana's seatbelt law is not punishable as a crime. It is an infraction. Apparently some of our Circuit judges have deemed settled law inapplicable if it fails to fit their litmus test of political correctness. Extrapolating to redefine terms of behavior in a violation of immigration law to the entire body of criminal law leaves a smorgasbord of opportunity for judicial mischief.

  3. I wonder if $10 diversions for failure to wear seat belts are considered moral turpitude in federal immigration law like they are under Indiana law? Anyone know?

  4. What a fine article, thank you! I can testify firsthand and by detailed legal reports (at end of this note) as to the dire consequences of rejecting this truth from the fine article above: "The inclusion and expansion of this right [to jury] in Indiana’s Constitution is a clear reflection of our state’s intention to emphasize the importance of every Hoosier’s right to make their case in front of a jury of their peers." Over $20? Every Hoosier? Well then how about when your very vocation is on the line? How about instead of a jury of peers, one faces a bevy of political appointees, mini-czars, who care less about due process of the law than the real czars did? Instead of trial by jury, trial by ideological ordeal run by Orwellian agents? Well that is built into more than a few administrative law committees of the Ind S.Ct., and it is now being weaponized, as is revealed in articles posted at this ezine, to root out post moderns heresies like refusal to stand and pledge allegiance to all things politically correct. My career was burned at the stake for not so saluting, but I think I was just one of the early logs. Due, at least in part, to the removal of the jury from bar admission and bar discipline cases, many more fires will soon be lit. Perhaps one awaits you, dear heretic? Oh, at that Ind. article 12 plank about a remedy at law for every damage done ... ah, well, the founders evidently meant only for those damages done not by the government itself, rabid statists that they were. (Yes, that was sarcasm.) My written reports available here: Denied petition for cert (this time around): http://tinyurl.com/zdmawmw Denied petition for cert (from the 2009 denial and five year banishment): http://tinyurl.com/zcypybh Related, not written by me: Amicus brief: http://tinyurl.com/hvh7qgp

  5. Justice has finally been served. So glad that Dr. Ley can finally sleep peacefully at night knowing the truth has finally come to the surface.

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