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IU Maurer announces extension of search for new dean

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The search for a new dean of the Indiana University Maurer School of Law is being extended, according to a statement released from the Indiana University Office of the Provost.

To help with finding a candidate to fill the top job at the law school, the university has now hired Korn/Ferry International, a recruiting firm based in Los Angeles. Also, the search committee has been reconstituted and is being chaired by John Applegate, executive vice president for University Regional Affairs, Planning and Policy.

Hannah Buxbaum will continue to serve as interim dean of Maurer.

Catherine Dyar, chief of staff for the provost, declined to comment on the status of the search other than to say it is continuing. She said she could not comment about whether any candidates had been interviewed or if anyone had been offered the position.

According to a new position advertisement, applications are due by Aug. 30, 2013, with the expected starting date to be Jan. 1, 2014.

Applegate dispelled concerns about the school having to extend its search.

“What I read into it is finding the right fit between the school and the candidate,” he said. “Sometimes it happens readily and obviously; sometimes it takes a bit more time.”

The job description calls for applicants who “preferably possess distinguished records of scholarship, teaching, professional experience, and/or public service, and be appropriate for tenure as a full professor at the law school.” In addition, candidates should have strong administrative and managerial skills “necessary for leading a law school on the campus of a highly interdisciplinary public research university.”

In a statement, Dyar explained that in order “to accommodate leaves, sabbaticals, and other requests, we have reconstituted the search committee, which will build on the excellent work of the first iteration of the committee.” The goal is for the committee to make an announcement of a decanal appointment in November 2013.

Applegate’s committee has held its first meeting and plans to spend the summer building on the work of the previous committee.

Like Dyar, he praised the work of the former committee lead by Patricia McDougall-Covin, the William L. Haeberle professor of entrepreneurship in the Kelley School of Business. Applegate said the first iteration of the search committee identified many good leads and developed good ideas.

He acknowledged his committee has an ambitious timetable, but he is confident it will find a qualified candidate by the end of the year.

IU Maurer School of Law began searching for a new dean when former dean Lauren Robel became executive vice president and provost of the IU Bloomington campus July 1. She was named the interim provost in December 2011 at which time Buxbaum, then executive associate dean for academic affairs at IU Maurer, was named interim dean.

Members of the reconstituted committee are:

Kevin Brown, Richard S. Melvin professor of law
Linda Fariss, director of the law library and senior lecturer in law
Michael Flannery, chair, IU Maurer board of visitors, alumnus
Charles Geyh, John F. Kimberling professor of law
Judge David Hamilton, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit
Andrea Havill, assistant dean of alumni relations
Joseph Hoffmann, Harry Pratter professor of law and director of strategic projects
Jay Krishnan, professor of law and Charles L. Whistler faculty fellow; director of India Initiative, Center on the Global Legal Profession; and co-director, Center for Law, Society and Culture
Lisa McKinney, member of board of visitors, past president of law alumni board, alumna
Donna Nagy, C. Ben Dutton professor of law
Aviva Orenstein, professor of law and Val Nolan faculty fellow
Cynthia Reichard, senior lecturer in law
Justice Loretta Rush, Indiana Supreme Court, alumna
Ryan Scott, associate professor of law
Laura Song, law student
Catherine Dyar, Office of the Provost, member ex officio.




 

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